Shakori ATF-162 - History

Shakori ATF-162 - History


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Shakori
(ATF-162: dp. 1,675 (f.), 1. 205'0", b. 38'6", dr. 15'4" (f.); s. 16.5 k.(tl.), cpl. 85; a. 1 3", 2 40mm.;cl. Navajo)

Shakori (ATF-162)—a fleet ocean tug laid down on 9 May 1945 by the Charleston Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. at Charleston, S.C.—was launched on 9 August 1945; and commissioned on 20 December 1945, Lt. William L. Sloan in command.

Since then, the major portion of Shakori's long Navy career has been spent in the Atlantic Ocean and in the Caribbean Sea. The tug has performed towing services all along the Atlantic seaboard and has often been called upon to tow targets for naval gunnery exercises.

On three occasions, Shakori has departed from her normal routine. In October and November of 1962 during the Cuban missile crisis, she assisted in the evacuation of dependents from Guantanamo Bay by transporting clothes to the evacuees on the high seas. Following that, she spent three weeks at Miami, Fla.,
as the crisis wore on to its conclusion. The second and third departures from routine came in 1966 and 1967. In 1966, the tug circumnavigated the globe, completing the Navy's second-longest bow, 11,000 miles, en route. In 1967, after returning to Little Creek, Va., for overhaul and training, she deployed to the Mediterranean for almost six months on 18 January.

On 3 June 1967, Shakori returned to Little Creek, Va., and resumed her Atlantic Caribbean bowing routine. This she has continued through 1974 and, as of 31 July, is inport at Little Creek, Va.


Catastrophe Strikes (1966­–1968)

Post-dive school, Carl Brashear spent a year aboard the fleet tug USS Shakori (ATF 162) before requesting a transfer to the salvage ship USS Hoist (ARS 40) in September 1965. Serving on Hoist would help him to earn qualifications needed to become a master diver.

In February 1966, the Navy sent Hoist and her crew to Palomares, Spain, to help search for a hydrogen bomb. The thermonuclear weapon had fallen into the Mediterranean Sea after two U.S. Air Force aircraft collided the month before. The United States urgently needed to recover it before another nation could.

On the afternoon of March 23, as Brashear directed the transfer of a crate to hold the bomb once found, the supply boat parted its mooring line. Brashear rushed to get his Sailors to safety. A steel pipe broke loose, flew across the deck just as Brashear pushed a Sailor out of the way, and struck Brashear. The blow critically injured his left leg.

The Navy would later award Brashear the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for his heroism that day. His quick action saved the Sailor’s life — but put his own in jeopardy.

“They said I was way up in the air just turning flips [from the impact of the pipe]. I landed about two foot inside that freeboard. I jumped up and started to run and fell over. That’s when I knew how bad my leg was.”

Carl Brashear’s Navy and Marine Corps Medal citation. The medal is the highest peacetime award for heroism, and recognizes “personal life-threatening risk” to the recipient.

Brashear was serving on USS Hoist when he was injured.

Navy salvors recovered the lost hydrogen bomb two weeks after Brashear’s injury, on April 7.

The Fight to Survive

USS Hoist’s corpsman sprang to work, placing two tourniquets on Carl Brashear’s leg. Brashear was transferred first to nearby ship USS Albany (CG 10), and then to a helicopter for an emergency medical evacuation.

Four hours after the accident occurred, Brashear and a doctor from USS Albany found themselves stuck on a runway in Spain awaiting another aircraft. Brashear went into shock from severe blood loss and passed out. The doctor later admitted he believed Brashear would die.

By the time Brashear arrived at the emergency room at Torrejon Air Force Base, he had no pulse or heartbeat. Medical staff managed to restart his heart and administered 18 pints of blood before he regained consciousness and stabilized.

He was eventually transferred back to the United States to the Portsmouth Naval Hospital in Virginia.

Road to Recovery

Although alive, Brashear had suffered severe compound fractures to both bones in his lower left leg. Doctors told him his injury would take three years to heal and that walking again would likely require a brace.

Brashear asked them to amputate, unwilling to wait years: “I can’t be tied up that long. I’ve got to get back to diving.” His leg became so badly infected they agreed, amputating below the knee on May 11, 1966. A second surgery performed in July removed another inch and a half from his leg to fully eliminate the infection.

As he recovered, Brashear researched. He read about an amputee pilot in the Canadian Air Force who had returned to flying. He discovered the capabilities of prosthetics. And he learned the importance of a positive mindset in accepting his amputation and finding new solutions.

In early December, he received his first prosthetic leg. (The leg was painted to match Caucasian skin, a reminder of the inequality afforded to African Americans.) Brashear immediately gave up his crutches and began adapting to his prosthetic limb.

“It took more willpower than I ever thought I had, to accept the fact that I had lost a leg. Once I accepted that, I knew I would win the fight to become a master diver.”

A prosthetic leg worn by Carl Brashear, in the collection of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Carl Brashear later in life, holding one of his prosthetic legs.

An Uphill Battle: Returning to Full Duty

True to his resilient nature, Carl Brashear was determined to dive again. He convinced the Navy to return him to Portsmouth Naval Hospital to be near the Norfolk diving school, headed by an old friend from salvage school, Chief Warrant Officer Clair Axtell Jr.

Axtell reluctantly agreed to let Brashear use the school’s diving facilities, knowing a mishap would ruin his career. Brashear dove in different diving systems — a MK V deep-sea rig, a shallow water diving suit, SCUBA gear — while a photographer took photos as proof of his competence.

The Bureau of Medicine and Surgery agreed to grant Brashear a trial period: he would be evaluated for one year at the Norfolk diving school to determine whether he could safely return to diving. The school’s new officer in charge, Chief Warrant Officer Raymond Duell, did not go easy on Brashear. (“That man dove me every day, every cotton-picking day,” Brashear recalled, “weekends and all.”) Brashear also led daily calisthenics for the other students, who didn’t realize he was an amputee and bemoaned his stamina.

At the end of the probationary year, he was restored to full duty as a Navy diver — the first time in Navy history for an amputee.

Brashear training with his prosthetic leg to climb diving ladders. The weights simulate the heavy MK V diving rig.

Brashear proving his diving aptitude post-amputation. Photo taken either at the Norfolk diving school or Deep Sea Diving School in Washington, D.C.

Brashear finishing a dive post-amputation. Photo taken either at the Norfolk diving school or Deep Sea Diving School in Washington, D.C.

“Sometimes I would come back from a run [during the evaluation period], and my artificial leg would have a puddle of blood from my stump. I wouldn’t go to sick bay. In that year, if I had gone to sick bay, they would have written me up. I’d go somewhere and hide and soak my leg in a bucket of hot water with salt in it — an old remedy. Then I’d get up the next morning and run.”


Flight Stories

September 14, 1976, was an unlucky day for the aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy. Approximately 100 miles northwest of Scapa Flow, Scotland, the ship was taking part in a 100 ship NATO exercise called “Teamwork 76”. It was Press Day and the assembled photographers of the United States and Europe watched as one of the ship’s F-14A Tomcat fighters — from VF-32 — taxied toward Catapult #3 for launch. The pilot, Lt. John L. Kosich, and his radar intercept officer, Lt. (jg) L. E. Seymour, prepared for launch. Suddenly, the engines inexplicably roared to full power. Lt. Kosich checked the throttle, but found it was still set at idle. He stomped the brakes, but the plane began to skid forward despite that he had locked tires, the combined thrust from the jet’s two, very powerful TF30-P-414A engines was just too much.

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Ahead, a line of aircraft loomed. Long black streaks of tire rubber scarred the deck. Steering left, Lt. Kosich ran the plane away from the other aircraft. The flight deck crew dived out of the way to the side. One crewman wasn’t fast enough and his ankle was caught under the tires and crushed. The rest made it safely away. Then F-14A’s right wing hit two adjacent planes, causing significant damage. By his fast thinking and actions, Lt. Kosich had prevented a catastrophic crash, one that would have likely caused a massive fire. The planes parked ahead were fully fueled and armed. Still, there was no stopping the F-14A. It dragged its way forward, despite the locked tires and headed toward the edge of the deck. As the plane rolled off the deck and started to fall toward the water below, Lts. Kosich and Seymour ejected.

F-14A Tomcat launching an AIM-54 Phoenix missile. Photo Credit: USN

The two men were safe and Tomcat sank beneath the waves. The plane was valued at just over $14 million, which in modern terms equates to $57 million when corrected for inflation for the 2012 year. The value of the plane, however, was far more than the cost of manufacturing — it featured the newest, best technologies in the US Navy’s air arsenal and if those secrets fell into Soviet hands, it would be costly beyond measure to US national security.

Nearby, a Soviet Navy cruiser was shadowing the fleet. It sailed close by and everyone instantly knew that the Soviets had logged the position of the accident. The ramifications were clear — the F-14A Tomcat carried America’s newest, top secret AIM-54 Phoenix missile system, as well as its revolutionary fire control radar, the AN/AWG-9. Knowing the Soviet Union’s deep sea recovery capabilities, it was apparent that the two superpowers were in a race to recover the plane before some of America’s most sensitive technologies fell into Soviet hands.

Six AIM-54 Phoenix missiles on the underside of a USN F-14A Tomcat. As it happened, the lost plane carried but one missile that day. Photo Credit: USN

The F-14 Tomcat and its Missile Systems

The US Navy’s F-14A Tomcat was deadly for one key reason — it was equipped with a revolutionary pair of combat systems, the AIM-54 Phoenix air-to-air missile and the AN/AWG-9 radar system. Managed by the radar intercept officer in the Tomcat’s back seat, the AIM-54 and AN/AWG-9 systems could track six targets simultaneously, redirect the missile in flight to alternate targets, and perform a lock-on in track-while-scan mode. It had an extraordinary range — 100+ nm — and the Phoenix missiles flew at a speed of Mach 5.

The missile had a maximum operating altitude of approximately 100,000 feet, which it incorporated into its attack profile, popping up and then descending on its targets from above. The US Military feared that if the Soviets recovered the aircraft and its missiles, they would reverse engineer the technology for their own use. That would be a dramatic leap forward in Soviet missile and radar technologies.

The US Navy would spare no effort in the recovery. It was a race against the Soviets.

AN-AWG-9 output screen inside the F-14A Tomcat, in the backseat at the radar intercept officers station. Photo Credit: USN

Recovery Effort

The aircraft had sunk into waters that were 1,850 feet deep. Recovering the plane and the single AIM-54 Phoenix missile that it had carried would be no easy matter. As the other ships in the NATO exercise Teamwork 76 sailed away, they were pleased to watch as the Soviet shadowing ships followed. The concern was, however, that the Soviets would quickly attempt a recovery with a deep net dragged by a trawler. Therefore, the US Navy ordered a 24 hour watch on the site by air. Soon a rotation of P-3C Orions out of Keflavik, Iceland, were flying in airborne shifts over the site.

To facilitate fast recovery before the winter season set in, a contract was put in place with Seaward, Inc., a company in Falls Church, Virginia, that served the Navy’s special requirements. As Norway is a strong NATO ally, one of its salvage ships, called “Constructor”, was subcontracted to assist. The US Navy loaded on board an unmanned, radio-controlled submersible called “CURV-III”, the third generation of the Navy’s “Cable-controlled Undersea Recovery Vehicle”, which had been flown out to the site from California specifically for the operation. The Norwegians, with their extensive experience in deep seabed operations for its oil industry, were a critical part of the team.

The British sent the ship, Oil Harrier, which featured large winches that were capable of lifting the plane, which had an estimated weight of 72,000 lbs (32,000 kg) when fully loaded. The side-scan sonar provider, Hydro Surveys, from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, was tasked to bring its equipment to the scene. The US Navy provided the Abnaki class fleet tug, USS Shakori (ATF-162), then under the command of Lieutenant Commander David Sargent, and several other vessels to the effort.

As it turned out, the ocean would not give up the F-14A Tomcat and its secret hardware so easily.

USS Shakori, which attempted the surface search using side-scan sonar. Photo Credit: USN

The first step in the recovery involved USS Shakori, which deployed the side-scan sonar gear that Hydro Surveys had quickly dispatched for the job. The ship searched for the lost plane. The cold North Atlantic, however, seemed to be conspiring against the effort. Massive waves popped rivets and threatened to wash crewmen overboard. Conditions were terrible.

Day after day for ten days, the sonar scans showed nothing. Finally, on October 3, the sonar showed a promising target. After carefully charting the location, which was a distance from where the plane was supposed to have been, USS Shakori returned to port for repairs and supplies. A week later, the ship set out once again to return to the spot.

On its arrival, the crew were shocked to discover that the sonar came up empty. The seabed where they had previously spotted what was possibly the plane was somehow bare. Had the plane moved? Had it been somehow covertly recovered by the Soviets? Had it been dragged by a quick moving Soviet trawler. Whatever they had seen before was gone.

Navy analysts stressed that the Soviets might have undertaken a quick snatch and grab of their own. How they could have done that was a mystery. The watchful eyes of the Iceland-based P-3C Orions were still monitoring the area.

USS Shakori commenced a new search. Conditions worsened, however, and the ship and crew were battered by violent seas.

Deploying the NR-1

As this was unfolding, a Sperry engineer named Roger Sherman walked into the headquarters of Submarine Squadron Two at Holy Loch, Scotland, with an idea — why not send the Navy’s top secret NR-1 submarine to recover the plane? The answer he received was shocking — the officers in the unit had no idea what the NR-1 was, nor that it was already within close reach of the crash site. It seemed that the Navy’s top secret “research” submarine was so secret that even the senior officers on the base didn’t know of its existence or capabilities.

Soon convinced of the NR-1’s unique potential to recover the aircraft, a coded message asking for authority to deploy the sub was sent up the chain to COMSUBLANT in Washington, DC. The Navy’s surface fleet responded: the submarine was not needed and they should stay out of the recovery effort.

The US Navy’s top secret “research” submarine, the NR-1. Photo Credit: USN

For Sherman, this seemed a travesty. First, the NR-1 was so secret that nobody in the Navy recognized that it was perfect for the recovery. Second, it seemed that the recovery effort had touched off a turf war between the surface Navy and submariners, reigniting long simmering intra-service competition.

From experience, Sherman knew that the real clout rested with the surface side of the Navy. Still, the submariners had a few cards to play. He called a friend, Capt. Art Francis, who was heading up nuclear reactor programs at the Groton, Connecticut, US Navy field office supporting Electric Boat (one of the Navy’s primary nuclear submarine builders). As one of those submarine nuclear officers who had been hand-picked for engineering in the submarine service, Capt. Francis had a direct line to Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, the Navy’s famously ornery submarine chief. He hoped that Adm. Rickover would take up the fight. If so, he would almost certainly win. In just a few hours, Rickover had been informed, made a decision, and the operation was a go. Word came back that the NR-1 mission was on — the code name for the operation was “Big Daddy”.

Capt. Toby Warson, USN, was put in charge of the recovery effort by the US Navy’s head of submarine operations in the Atlantic, COMSUBLANT, Admiral Joe Williams, USN. Capt. Warson was assigned at the time as commanding officer of the Blue Crew on USS George Washington Carver (SSBN-), one of the Navy’s most powerful ballistic missile submarines. Three years earlier, he had been the skipper of NR-1.

On board NR-1 was the sub’s current skipper, CDR Allison J. “Al” Holifield, USN, who was to have been reassigned but stayed on with the boat when the mission was assigned, and the man who was supposed to have relieved him in command, CDR Mike McQuown, USN. As well, the Executive Officer, Joe Nolter, who was also the one at the helm and their engineering officer, Mike Riegel, filled out the along with at least one other individual whose name is yet to be identified. The normal complement of the NR-1 for deep sea operations was once described as being 3 officers, 8 crewmen, and 2 scientists.

The Search Succeeds

The NR-1 was towed to the site by the Navy vessel, USS Sunbird (ASR-15), under the command of CDR Edward Craig, USN. USS Sunbird was a Chanticleer-class submarine rescue ship. The US Navy and Royal Navy were tasked together to keep the area clear of any Soviet vessels. Thus, the US Navy ordered an attack submarine, USS Batfish, to “sanitize” the area to ensure that no non-allied vessels were present as the NR-1 did its work. Loaded with torpedoes, the submarine cruised into the area, very aware that the unspecific nature of the term, “sanitize”, had potentially profound consequences. On the surface, the Royal Navy provided HMS Blue Rover to keep an eye out.

Soviet involvement was clearly being discouraged in the most raw terms. It was a message that the Soviets could not have missed. Nonetheless, the Soviets sent a fleet of recovery ships backed by the Soviet Navy, undeterred by the threat. The Soviets were intent on defending the international right of salvage, giving all nations the legitimate right to recover any ship or asset that was lost at sea. It seemed that the Soviets were willing to resort to arms if necessary.

Days passed in additional searching before USS Shakori relocated what they thought might have been the sonar target. Immediately upon its arrival on October 21, 1976, the NR-1 dove to the seabed and found that the area littered with large, irregular boulders, each of which returned signals at varying strengths based on the angles of the sonar pulse and the varying sizes of the boulders. This was why the surface ships with their side-scan sonar systems were having difficulty finding the wreck.

The NR-1 was uniquelly equipped for the job at hand. It had four external, electrical thrusters and advanced navigation systems that enabled it to remain motionless in the ocean, despite the current, or move with precision in any direction. It could even crawl on the seabed with a set of tracks that lined its keel. In the nose of the submarine was an observation compartment, in which up to two men would lie down prone and peer out of one of three thick glass portholes at the seafloor as it was illuminated by a bank of thallium lighting. The NR-1 began a laborious box search pattern of a roughly square mile area of the seabed, seeking to find the lost Tomcat by eyes alone. It was the only way.

The search proceeded without incident. The NR-1, however, found that the Tomcat was simply not where it should have been. The NR-1 then proceeded to investigate a sonar reflection that it was getting a few miles distant. As it neared the site, quite suddenly, the NR-1 spotted a massive tangle of numerous trawler nets directly ahead on its course about 100 feet over the seabed. The skipper ordered the submarine to reverse at full emergency power. If the sub couldn’t stop in time, it would possibly get tangled in the nets, with catastrophic results. The sub stopped just 20 feet from the first nets. It was a very close call. Backing away, the NR-1’s skipper took the submarine deeper to look at the seabed on the assumption that the nets had caught on something.

Photograph from aboard the USN’s NR-1 submarine of the F-14A Tomcat, inverted on the ocean floor. Photo Credit: Capt. Allison J. Holifield, USN-Ret.

At the base of the nets, the NR-1’s crew spotted the F-14A. It was lying on its back, upside-down, with one wing crushed. Apparently, it had been dragged by a trawler’s nets a few miles away from where it had originally fallen into the sea. Clearly, it was either a trawler operated by the Soviets or just a deep sea commercial fishing trawler. Nobody knew which it was, but there were few fish to be found that deep in the ocean. Further, commercial fishermen were unlikely to fish that deep. All evidence pointed to the Soviets — they had gotten there first and quite nearly gotten away with the plane and its missile.

Photographs of the nets and buoy floats revealed a variety of origins — French numbers, UK fleet numbers, and, most ominously, Cyrillic writing. It appeared that the Russians had tried to drag the plane off after all. Most probably, they had done it during the week when USS Shakori had headed back in Scotland. The plane was too heavy for the nets, however. The Soviets had failed, but only based on the thickness of the net ropes. The tables had turned and US Navy had the aircraft in sight.

Yet the NR-1 reported back with another problem — the AIM-54 Phoenix missile was missing. Perhaps it had detached when the plane was dragged or perhaps the Soviets had managed to recover at least that. Nobody knew.

Recovery and Missile Search

The task of recovering the plane with the NR-1 was challenging. The plane was snagged in multiple nets and they floated in the current, waving back and forth. The nets threatened to snag and trap the submarine on the bottom. The NR-1 had to creep up, keeping its stern screws away from the wreck and nets, and attempt to tie a cable around the plane with its remotely operated arm. If the current shifted or the nets started to move toward the submarine, they would have to back away.

Further complicating the task was a newly discovered deep sea phenomenon that the sub crew christened as Nolter’s Maelstrom. This was a sudden blast of current that was the equivalent of a straight line wind, except that it raked the ocean floor. Nolter’s Maelstrom was something previously unknown to science. To this day, there is explanation as to why such ocean currents shift. Throughout the effort, as often as twice a day, the NR-1 would be hit by this newly discovered powerful deep current wave, each time nearly tipping over the submarine. Likewise, when the current suddenly picked up, the submarine was at risk of being snagged in the trawler nets.

After the first failed attempt, the F-14A Tomcat settled back to the ocean floor upright. Another photograph from the NR-1. Photo Credit: USN via Fred DeGrooth, Sr.

Meanwhile on the surface, the Soviet Navy’s recovery fleet was arriving in the area. The Royal Navy did its best to shepherd away the vessels, but they closed the distance relentlessly. Day after day, they were working their way toward the site, ignoring warnings from the RN ships. Finally, they too had arrived. By then, a small fleet of US Navy and contract vessels were on the scene.

The Soviets had arrived in record time, as if they knew exactly where the wreck was — which was likely if they had earlier snagged the vessel with the trawler. Yet the recovery was nearly completed — or so the US Navy hoped.

A tense standoff ensued. The US Navy proceeded with its efforts at recovery while the Soviets stood by, hoping that they would fail. Nothing was apparent on the surface and the Soviets assumed that the US Navy wasn’t yet able to work at the site. Meanwhile, unbeknownst to the Soviets on the scene, deep below and hidden from sight, the recovery lines were set into place by the NR-1.

Lift Attempts

Another storm rolled in even as one of the American ships took the lines and prepared to lift the aircraft. The seas swelled to 20 feet wave heights as the lift began.

Nearby, the Soviets recognized that something was up. They could see lines being attached and the winches starting to move. The Soviets ordered one of their ships to make a run toward the US Navy ship that was lifting the plane, hoping to disrupt the recovery. The Soviet vessel was intercepted and blocked, however, then ushered away.

The Soviets refused to give up and crept closer, watching for whatever evidence they could see. The lift proceeded slowly because the ships were rocking and getting tossed in the heavy seas. Each wave put stress on the lift cables, risking that they would break and the wreck of the F-14A would fall back to the seabed.

Finally, the stresses were too much and halfway up, the lines suddenly snapped. Just as everyone had feared, the plane fell to the bottom once again. This time it landed right side up. The NR-1 would have to locate the precise position of the plane once again, though this time they knew where to find, if only generally, within a much smaller area.

The Soviets seemed pleased. They continued to wait as the US Navy adjusted their position and began the days long task of relocating the plane. The NR-1 set new capbles and another lift was attempted. As the winches rotated, the cables tightened. The lift had begun. Yet again the plane was brought closer to the surface, and then, just as before, heavy seas put too much stress on the cables — they snapped. The Tomcat fell back to the sea floor.

Taking their cue from the Soviets, the US Navy decided on a brute force solution. The new plan was that the Tomcat would be lassoed once again by the NR-1 and then, rather than lifting it, it would dragged to shallower waters. The Navy quietly hired a pair of deep sea trawlers for the job.

The Search for the Missing Phoenix Missile

Far below, the NR-1 was ordered to abandon the recovery and go in search of the missing AIM-54 Phoenix missile. Once more, it cruised slowly in a search pattern, eyeballing the bottom of the ocean for the missing Phoenix missile. Finally, they spotted it resting on the bottom and only slightly damaged. Up above, the Soviets and Americans eyed one another, the Soviets were unaware of the new plan and expected that another lift attempt would soon be made.

The AIM-54 Phoenix missile as found, photographed from aboard the NR-1 submarine. Photo Credit: Capt. Allison J. Holifield, USN-Ret.

Whereas the plane had been too large for the NR-1 to recover on its own, the missile was an ideal size. The only problem was that nobody knew really if the warhead was armed. There was a possibility that the missile might explode during the recovery, which would likely destroy the submarine, killing everyone on board.

After a series of discussions, it was decided to order the NR-1 to proceed despite the risk. Positioning itself overhead, the submarine deployed its keel claw and slowly lowered itself atop the missile. Once certain that the missile was directly underneath, the claw was clamped gently closed. With the missile securely in hand, the NR-1 then rose to the surface, rising slowly to time its surfacing with the darkness of midnight. That way, the Soviets would be unable to get a good image of the submarine in the darkness or know exactly what it was doing.

Once it was the surface, the NR-1 bobbed in the heavy seas. With care, the missile was connected to cables from another surface ship. Everyone held their breath, hoping that when the NR-1’s keel claw was released, that the missile wouldn’t fall back to the seabed. The cables attached to the missile held and once the NR-1 released its hold on the missile, it was easily winched aboard one of the surface ships.

The wrecked, crumpled remains of the F-14A Tomcat, with the German recovery vessel “Taurus” seen behind, arriving in Scotland.

Recovering the F-14 Tomcat

Finally, the pair of German heavy trawlers that the Navy had hired arrived on the scene. One was the “Taurus”. The two trawlers dragged a heavy cable along the seabed and snagged the plane. Then, as one waited, the other ran circles around the F-14 until it was securely trapped amidst a knot of cable. Then the plane was lifted nearly to the surface. The two trawlers towed the Tomcat wreck to shallower water, where it was finally recovered. Traditional shallow water recovery methods were easily applied.

Although the plane was wrecked and twisted, a US Navy team quickly determined that all of the key components were still there. Despite the odds, the US Navy had saved the plane and its top secret hardware from falling into Soviet hands.

Al Holifield, the third NR-1 OIC, and his predecessor, Toby Warson, flank Sunbird CO Ed Craig beside the recovered Phoenix missile. Photo Credit: Capt. Allison J. Holifield, USN-Ret.

The recovery of the Tomcat from the seabed was extraordinary. So was the cost — ultimately, the US Navy had expended more than $2.4 million on the effort, however, America’s technology secrets were far more valuable than that. The Soviets too were impressed, though not positively. In addition to losing out on an excellent opportunity to steal modern US technology, they realized that they had a new and different problem.

The US Navy issued a press release that described how the missile had been recovered by a vessel they had never heard of before — the NR-1. The press release simply referred to a “five man research submersible”, leaving the Soviets perplexed. The existence of the NR-1 would dog Soviet intelligence officers for years to come. They wondered just what the little submarine could do. It had surfaced in the darkness of night and they had been unable to take photographs. How had it gotten the job done? How deep could it dive? What was it really doing? How could it snag and recover the Phoenix missile?

One More Bit of Aviation History

It took another ten years for the Soviets to finally acquire the F-14 Tomcat and learn its secrets. The Tomcat and its top secret Phoenix missiles had been sold to America’s key Gulf Region ally, Iran, during the 1970s. With the revolution of 1979, the Iranian Air Force found itself on the other side. An embargo on spare parts and systems soon hampered the Iran’s ability to support the planes and its complex systems. Hard up for cash, the Iranians allowed the Soviets to pay to have a close look at the AIM-54 and AN/AWG-9 systems. By the time the Soviet Union reverse engineered the missile, however, the US Navy had deployed a new generation of air-to-air missiles. The AN/AWG-9 radar and AIM-54 Phoenix missile were retired in favor of a new generation of yet more sophisticated missiles and systems — the AMRAAM. Still, the NR-1 had given the US Navy another ten years of technological superiority.

Today’s Aviation History Question

Throughout its service life, how many AIM-54 missiles were ever fired in combat and what was their score?


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Items referring to his World War II service with the Philippine Commonwealth Army:

  • His photograph and Biographical Data
  • A copy of his poem, “Veterans of World War Two”
  • A copy of his poem, “United States Arm Forces in the Far East USAFFE”
  • A copy of his essay-poem, “Immigration Law”
  • A copy of a letter of April 11, 1986, from the Philippine Army Team Awards and VA Benefits Section
  • A copy of his World War II Philippine Service decoration Certificate signed by Ferdinand E. Marcos, President of the Philippines, February 13, 1967
  • A copy of his 1997 VFW Certificate of Appreciation
  • His World War II memoir, “WWII Remembrances of Richard G. Wellman, LT. USNR 226275, Aboard The Destroyer U.S.S. Macomb (DD458) and the Attack Transport U.S.S. Hampton (APA 115)
  • Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum, Home of the WWII Aircraft Carrier YORKTOWN, WWII Destroyer LAFFEY, WWII Submarine CLAMAGORE, and WWII Coast Guard Cutter INGHAM, Charleston Harbor, South Carolina with accompanying Tour Guide and Map
  • Congressional Medal of Honor Museum at Patriots Point, Charleston Harbor, South Carolina
  • Copy of a color painting by Michael Short, “The Eyes of Eagles,” showing P-51 Mustangs of the 357th Fighter Group outbound over the southeast coast of England, signed by Gen. Chuck Yeager, Col. C. E. Anderson, Capt. William R. O’Brien, and Capt. William B. Overstreet, Jr. (to be stored flat in the Marshall Foundation Archives)
  • Copies of the 357th Fighter Group Newsletters, #1-59 on CD, with Index
  • A video-tape of “World War II 357th Fighter Group in Action Fighter Aces of World War II”
  • A video-tape, “Mustang Magic – War Chronicles of the 357th Fighter Group”
  • A World War II Memoir by William B. Overstreet
  • A Memoir – �th Fighter Group – A Collection of Stories – Its History, Its People, Its Airplanes” from the American Aviation Historical society Journal
  • A WWII Memoir – “Some Personal Recollections of 1st. Lt. George A. Behling, Jr., USAF”
  • A WWII Memoir by Bernanrd Saunders, Bataan Death March survivor
  • A copy of “Escort” magazine, Anniversary Issue, March 1945, featuring the 357th Fighter Group
  • A Certificate of Appreciation from the Pilots of the 357th Fighter Group to the Ground and Support Units – signed by Chuck Yeager
  • A color photograph of 357th pilot Capt. Kit Carson in his plane – 1945
  • A copy of a story, “The Dead’ Yank Hero of Orleans Forest”
  • Copies of three Distinguished Unit Citations for the 357th Fighter Group

Received 3/22/94 – Entered into Memories Files 4/9/02

  • Mr. Hooper sent some written memories of his World War II and Korean War military service, including contacts with General Marshall, to the Marshall Foundation in March 1994. The stories were filed away – and rediscovered in April 2002. An unsuccessful attempt was made to locate Mr. Hooper on 9 April 2002. The stories include memories by Mr. Hooper from his World War II service in the Gilberts-Marshalls campaign and his tour in Hawaii, and with the 14th Air Force and the 502nd Group during the Korean War.

Received 3/20/02 – Entered into Memories Files 4/11/02

  • A Story dictated by Mr. Scott regarding his World War II experiences in Italy in 1943, with the 2nd Battalion, 141st Infantry Regiment of the 36th Infantry Division – specifically, an anecdote about “the Pope and Hitler.”
  • A pamphlet, “Welcome Aboard – USS Shakori [ATF-162] on the history of this ship, commissioned 20 December 1945 for the U.S. Navy a pamphlet entitled “Launching – Norfolk Navy Yard, October 15, 1942, and two newspaper clippings bout a National Guard plane accident, which she sent from the estate of her father, Paschal N. Brescia, Jr., who served with the First Army, Twelfth Group, and the Third Army during World War II.
  • Her book, “Flying High – World War II Letters to and from U.S. Army Air Force Bases and the Home Front.”
  • His World War II memoir, detailing his service with the 87th chemical Mortar Battalion on D-Day, and at the Battle of Hurtgen Forest and The Battle of the Bulge
  • His essay, “Japanese Treachery”
  • 3 Commemorative Patches: “D-Day, Normandy Invasion, June 6 – 1944 Veteran” – “Battle of the Bulge – Dec 16, 1944-Jan. 25, 1945 – World War II Veteran” – “Hurtgen Forest Germany – Death Factory – World War II Veteran – Oct. 22-1944 – Dec 20 1944 – 87th Chemical Mortar BN
  • A Decal – 󈭇th Chemical Mortar Battalion – Hurtgen Forest 1944”
    Received 4/22/02
  • A story about the Company names of the 4th Division
  • A Chronological History of the 87th Chemical Mortar Battalion
  • A copy of the handwritten memoir of U.S. Army Corporal Charles Louis Stumpp, 1943-1945, who served with the 113th Chemical Processing company, which later became part of the 87th Chemical Mortar Battalion
  • A copy of a Commendation for Meritorious Service for the 113th Chemical Processing company, dated 18 August 1944
  • A copy of the List of Officers and Enlisted Men of the 113th Chemical Processing company, dated 17 November 1944
  • A copy of a photograph of the men of the 113th Chemical Processing Company, Camp Sibert
  • Two World War II stories, “Coast Guard Heroes, Signalman First Class Douglas A. Munro,” and Taney (U.S. Coast Guard Cutter) at Pearl Harbor.” (With copies of artwork and photograph)
  • A color photograph of the memorial, The Four Chaplains – WW II with
  • His father’s combat history during World War II, “Pvt. Benjamin Gottlieb, 83rd Div. 329th Reg” a poem, ‘Death Be Not Proud,” which he wrote as a tribute to his father and a piece that he wrote, “Pvt. Benjamin Gottlieb Speaks, “ in memory of his father.
  • Two additional excerpts from his father’s World War II letters, dated June 6-10, 1944, at St. Mere Eglise, and early July to July 23, 1944, at St. Lo.
  • A copy of a letter to his aunt from his father, postmarked December 30, 1943, while he was in basic training at Camp Croft, South Carolina
  • A copy of a photograph of his father, Pvt. Benjamin Gottlieb, Jan 4, 1908-July 23, 1944
  • A copy of “St. Lo, Normandy: July 1944” – by Michael Gottlieb
  • Copies of three pages from “The Thunderbolt Across Europe” A History of the 83rd Infantry Division, 1942-1945, including a map
  • Copies of letters to him from Senator Terry Sanford of North Carolina (September 1, 1992) Colin L. Powell, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (16 June 1992) and Henry H. Shelton, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (11 July 2000) – with reference to his father
  • A copy of his essay, “What Are The Root Causes of War and Violence?” and copies of other articles and photographs on this subject
  • A copy of his essay, “American Servicemen in Combat During WW2”
  • A copy of a research paper by Vincent Papke, “Abandoned: A Look at American World War II Orphans”
  • A WW II Story about a German Commander who returned six captured American medics to the 83rd Infantry Division in Normandy in July 1944, because he believed the Americans would need their services in the coming battle. The gift includes an account of the story in German.
  • A color map of World War II Pacific Theater Operations
  • The Official History of the USS Maryland (BB46), with a copy of a photo of the ship, a listing of her Naval Honors, and a listing of her shipmates who gave their lives in action with the enemy during World War II
  • A memoir, “Leyte Gulf, Philippine Islands, World War II,” relating his service aboard the USS Maryland
  • A Memoir, “Wartime – Honolulu, Hawaii,” relating a humorous story about men from the USS Maryland returning from liberty
  • A copy of a map of Pearl Harbor, 7:57 a.m., December 7, 1941
  • A list of World War II American Battleships and their cost
  • Copies of two telegrams dated 30 Oct 44 and 2 Nov 44
  • A photograph of Frank O. King, Mrs. Ayers’ second cousin, in uniform
  • A photograph of Frank O. King and George Carley, in uniform
  • An Army Exchange Service Ration Card dated 5 May, 1945
  • A gasoline Purchase permit for 10 Gallons, dated 8/25/45
  • W War Department Tobacco Ration Card, expiring 27 October 1945
  • A Sleeping Quarters Card
  • An Army green cloth drawstring bag of personal items, including a sewing kit and shaving brush
  • His memoir of stories and anecdotes, detailing his pre-war occupation and World War II service with the United States Coast Guard from September 1942 through November 1945, including service in Panama, Saipan, Iwo Jima, Okinawa, and New Caledonia.
  • His memoirs, “Richard A. Sebian – A Personal Account of His Experiences in World War II Since Leaving the United States as a ‘G.I. Joe’ on the 22nd of March, 1944,” and “Some Remembrances of Happenings During the 17 Months Out of the States Not Mentioned In My Letters to Brother Tom,” including copies of photographs, maps, and news articles plus the memoir (in English) of Gunther Schmidt, a German infantryman with whom he corresponded, “The Set-Up of the 272 Volksgrenadier Division at the Sallgow-Doberitz and in action in The Eifel 1944/45
  • His father’s memoir, “War Diary of Colonel Earl W. Peak 0-312317,” including copies of photographs, maps, and news articles pertaining to his service with the 6th Signal Company, 6th Infantry Division, in New Guinea to the completion of the Philippine Campaign.
  • His memoir, “My Diary – 1943-1944,” Relating his service as a medical officer in the South Pacific from 31 October 1943 through 10 August 1944.
  • A Map of The Campaign of Western Europe, “D” -Day through “V-E” Day, 6 June 1944 – 8 May 1945, 102nd Cavalry Group Mecz, listing the personnel of the First, Third, Seventh and Ninth Army Attachments, and the Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, and Nineteenth Corps Attachments
  • His Memoir, “Dominick Richard “Dick” Castellone: – detailing his service with the 102nd Cavalry Mechanized Squadron from D-Day through his discharge from the Army on July 29, 1945
  • A Written Tribute to him from his family on the 50th Anniversary of the Invasion of Normandy, D-Day, June 6, 1944
  • Copies of letters to him and his two brothers, from students to whom they spoke about their wartime experiences in New Rochelle, New York
  • Six copies of “Bolts & Bullets,” a newsletter published by the U.S. Navy Seabees, 101st Battalion: July 29th, 1944, from “Somewhere in the Pacific” 29 December 1944, from the Marianas Islands 6 January 1945, from the Marianas Islands 13 January 1945, from the Marianas Islands 20 January 1045, from the Marianas Islands, and 14 April 1945, from the Marianas Islands. – Mr. Chittum received these items through his mother, from his uncle, John C. Gilmore, who served with the 101st Battalion, U.S. Navy Seabees, in the Marianas Islands.
  • His memoir, “Private’s Memories From WW II,” detailing his service with the 63rd Infantry Division in Europe
  • A copy of the Company History of the 293rd Ordnance MM Company from 15 December 1942 through 31 November 1945
  • A copy of the “Menu for Thanksgiving Day, 83rd General Hospital, 23 November 1944
  • A copy of the “History of the 182nd Ordnance Depot Company” from 16 April 1943 through 15 May 1945
  • Copies of obituary notices of four World War II veterans from Winchester, Virginia
  • A copy of an “Open Forum” article, featuring a WW II story by Robert S. Gordanier, on the U.S. Army at Chanyi in China, 1945, from The Winchester Star of July 3, 2000
  • His memoir, “World War II – The South Pacific,” relating his service with the 121st Troop Carrier Squadron a copy of an article, “Tale of Action Told By Twenty-Seven Medals on Chests of Three Baer Field Sergeants,” (including him) from “The Beacon,” dated December 18th 1943, and copies of three photographs of the aircraft carrier Hornet, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • His memoir, “The Korean War: Observations from Ground and Air, 1952-53”
  • A letter to his grandson, “A Korean War Veteran Remembers”
  • A color copy of the medals and ID card of Lt. William Nimmo, Korean War
  • A copy of 3 ID cards in English, Korean, and Chinese, which he carried as an Air Force observer
  • A copy of a photograph of William F. Nimmo, Jr., Korea 1953, age 24, First Lieutenant Field Artillery, U.S. Army
  • A black/white photograph of 2Lt William F. Nimmo, August 1952 near Kumhwa, Korea, at site of Battery C, 981st Field Artillery Battalion, 40th Infantry Division
  • A copy of the March 29, 1941 issue of The Covington Virginian, Covington, Virginia, featuring the article: “Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Anderson of R.F.D. 1, Clifton Forge have Four sons- One Daughter in Service,” with photos, including her husband, Sgt. Carl W. Anderson, U.S. Army Air Corps
  • A copy of the April 12, 1939 issue of The Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, Florida, with the headline “Four Warships Arrive Here for Week’s Visit”
  • A copy of the May 12, 1939 issue of The San Diego Sun, with the headline, 󈫺,000 Sailors Back Home”
  • A copy of the June 1945 issue of The Virginia Legionnaire
  • A copy of the July 29, 1943 issue of The Covington Virginian, Covington, Virginia, featuring several war-time articles
  • A Basic Field Manual and Soldier’s Handbook issued by the War Department on May 4, 1942
  • A copy of her husband’s memoir, “Reminiscences of World War II by William H. Romm. M.D., VMI Class of ‘43” – (U.S. Marine Corps)
  • A copy of a postcard which his father, Cpl. Francis A. Norene, sent to his (the corporal’s) mother, Mrs. Maude A. Norene, dated January 10, 1945, while a prisoner of war somewhere in Germany.
  • Eleven picture postcards, from various locations in the United States and Germany, dating from December 1, 1944, through May 23, 1946, which he sent to his mother, Mrs. Ernest Carroll, during his service with the United States Army during World War II. (Fourth contribution from Mr. Carroll.
  • Additional gifts: Seven true stories of his World War II experiences with the following titles: “I’ll Remember,” “War Is Hell,” “Assaulting the Beaches,” “My Career As A Public Speaker,” “My Buddies,” “The Doughnut Makers,” and “Day of Infamy,” plus several essays and drawings relating to war.
  • Four more of his personal World War II stories: “Embarrassing Moment,” “WOW-Real Food,” “Merchant Marine,” and “Memories
  • An audio cassette tape of a speech he made about some of his World War II Army (3rd Infantry Division) experiences – “Italy at Close Range.”
  • The story of the flag that flew on board the USS Herndon DD638, the first American warship to enter French territorial waters during the Normandy invasion in June 1944, copies of two newspaper articles, “Luck Rides Aboard the Herndon, But Courage Rides with Her Too,” and “Destroyer Fire Open’s Army’s Path,” and a color photograph of the flag. (His second gift)

presented to Marshall Museum Director Julie Kemper on 12 October 2002 – Stored in Museum.

Recollections of his Korean War Service with the U.S. Air Force, (448th Reserve B 25 Light Bomb Wing and 452nd B 25 Light Bomb Wing) and some recent observations while at the American Air Museum in Britain.

Copies of several documents and letters with regard to his father, Curtis Adler, known as a “name detective,” who contacted numerous personalities about the origins of their names, including General George C. Marshall, General Omar N. Bradley, Senator Alben W. Barkley, Senator Estes Kefauver, Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes, Bernard M. Baruch, and others, plus copies of other letters to Curtis Adler and other members of his family in the post World-War II years.


Shakori Hills GrassRoots Live! Kicks Off POD Concert & Livestream Series, Confirms Fall 2021 Festival [Watch]

With its successful opening performances by Keller Williams and Sam Bush Band now in the rearview, Pittsboro, NC’s Shakori Hills GrassRoots Live!concert series is primed and ready to provide North Carolina music fans with a steady stream of socially distant live music throughout May and June. The socially distant series will serve as an appetizer for the return of the fall Shakori Hills GrassRoots Festival of Music & Dance, set to take place from October 7th–11th after a year off in 2020.

The outdoor, “POD”-format series continues with bluegrass legend Del McCoury and his band (5/8), progressive grass stalwarts Yonder Mountain String Band (5/15), New Orleans funk staples Galactic (5/22), Grammy-nominated roots trio The Wood Brothers with singer-songwriter Ryan Montbleau (6/4), multi-talented folk sister act Rising Appalachia (6/5) and two nights of Donna The Buffalo, the founders of Shakori Hills GrassRoots Festival, on 6/11 and 6/12.

In addition to the live performances, for the first time in its 17-year history, Shakori Hills is offering high-definition, multi-camera livestreams of all the upcoming GrassRoots Live! shows. For more information or to grab your livestream tickets, head here.

“It was wonderful to once again see the Shakori Hills Meadow Stage field full of happy music lovers!” said Jordan Puryear, the co-founder of Shakori GrassRoots. “We are so glad to be presenting the amazing talents of Del McCoury Band, Yonder Mountain String Band, Galactic and Donna the Buffalo…and to all the gracious folks of North Carolina, thank you!”


Our Story

Here at Shakori Hills, we support our local music and arts community through cultural events and outreach to our local schools, while teaching environmental awareness and sustainable living practices.

The GrassRoots Festival presents over 40 bands spanning world-wide traditional styles and genres. Each moment of the festival offers exciting and educational opportunities in which the entire family can participate! There are special children’s and youth areas with games, crafts, and interactive workshops. Workshops for children and adults encompass everything from how to play the fiddle, to movement (dance, yoga, etc) or garden classes and seminars on current green issues affecting the world around us.

The festival also provides a great venue for education in World Music, volunteerism, and for local food and craft vendors to display and sell their wares. We support our local nonprofit community and organizations by offering space to set up tables and share their mission with thousands of festival attendees and donate festival tickets to local nonprofits to help their mission and fundraising activities.

The Hoppin’ John Old-Time & Bluegrass Fiddlers’ Convention brings musicians, dancers and music lovers together in celebration of old-time and bluegrass music, North Carolina’s traditional music. Attendees enjoy dance, instrument and band contests, square dances, instructional workshops and unscheduled magical moments.

The convention helps keep traditional music and culture alive and offers opportunities for young people to play on stage, learn and share the music, regardless of experience or skill level.

Now in its 11th year, Hoppin’ John is the only event of its kind in the Piedmont Region. As each part of the land bearing Appalachian traditions has its own nuances and playing styles, the event has played an important role in the preservation of our traditional music and culture.

Our longest running program, Roots in the Schools (formerly Hopes and Dreams) brings musicians and artists into local schools. These sessions range from classroom instructional workshops to entire-school concerts. At a time when public schools are cutting music and art budgets, Roots in the Schools (RiS) makes a real difference in our children’s education. RiS operates in conjunction with the GrassRoots Festival and Hoppin’ John Fiddlers’ Convention three times per year, but with your support we can extend it throughout the school year.

The newest edition to our educational programming is the Shakori Hills chapter of JAM (Junior Appalachian Musicians). These classes offer low to no-cost music lessons to children in fiddle, mandolin, guitar and dance. Classes meet on Thursday evenings at Silk Hope Elementary School, and are open to all fourth – seventh grade students.

The Shakori Hills Community Garden is an 8,800 square foot organic garden with three crop rotation areas designed to keep the growing and harvesting on a year-round cycle. Anyone interested in participating can, from sharing in the decisions about what gets planted to taking home the harvest. Garden Coordinator and Central Carolina Community College Sustainable Agriculture Instructor, Cheryl McNeill, leads free weekly workshops open to the public. Excess harvest (1,000 pounds this year) is donated to the CORA Food Pantry.

Shakori Hills also partners with other non-profit groups in hosting their events and fundraisers, such as the Piedmont Earthskills Gathering each April and the Chatham County Girl Scout Summer Camp.

2016 development saw improved landscape engineering which promoted site drainage and considerably less mud during large events. We saw the fruits of these labors at the 2017 GrassRoots Festival when many inches of rain fell in the days leading up to the festival, yet the site was virtually mud-free (excluding the parking lot, which still needs work).

A men’s and women’s permanent 10-stall restroom building was completed in 2017.

Fostering and developing our infrastructure allows us to create and host more offerings and events year round.

Shakori Hills Community Arts Center is a place where everyone can enjoy nature, take strolls on beautiful trails, have family afternoons in the sun and enjoy art, music, family, life and all it has to offer. By building on what we are blessed to have at our fingertips, our local culture will continue to strengthen and prosper!


Shakori Tribe

The Shakori Indians were a small tribe of North Carolina, allies of the Catawba Indians. Their language was never recorded, but may have been a Siouan language similar to Catawba. The Shakoris no longer exist as a distinct tribe. They merged together with their Catawba neighbors in the 18th century. Most Shakori descendants still live among the Catawbas today, although like other Carolina Siouan groups, there are probably people of Shakori descent among the Lumbee tribe.

Thanks for your interest in Native American languages!

Shakori Language Links

Shakori Culture and History Links


USS William J. Bordelon DD/DDR 881

GEARING CLASS
Displacement 3460 Tons (Full), Dimensions, 390' 6"(oa) x 40' 10" x 14' 4" (Max)
Armament 6 x 5"/38AA (3x2), 12 x 40mm AA, 11 x 20mm AA, 10 x 21" tt.(2x5).
Machinery, 60,000 SHP General Electric Geared Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 36.8 Knots, Range 4500 [email protected] 20 Knots, Crew 336.
Operational and Building Data
Laid down by Consolidated Steel,
Orange Texas . September 9 1944
Launched March 3 1945 and commissioned June 5 1945.
Decommissioned February, 1977

Built by the Orange, Texas yards of Consolidated Steel Corp., Bordelon slid from the ways on 3 Mar. 1945. The USS Bordelon was commissioned on 5 June 1945, with Cdr. Michael J Luosey USN, as her first commanding officer. Upon completion of outfitting and provisioning, Bordelon stood out from Galveston on 22 June 1945 for shakedown in the area of Guantanamo Bay , Cuba , arriving there on the 25th. Upon completion of these maneuvers she cleared the Caribbean on 22 July enroute for Norfolk Navy Yard for post-shakedown availability.

In the summer of 1945 Bordelon underwent conversion to a Radar Picket Destroyer (DDR) at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. This change removed the torpedo tubes and added additional 40 mm guns. Most visible was the addition of a tripod after-mast supporting the large antenna for the altitude-measuring radar (SP). Departing Norfolk 5 Sept., she sailed to Guantanamo Bay , Cuba for gunnery practice and sea trials. On the return trip to Norfolk , in a smooth sea, an eight-hour shakedown run was made during which she traveled at over 38 knots. After several days spent conducting tests on a new product to lay down smoke screens, Bordelon sailed for Casco Bay , Maine . As part of the Casco Bay Training Program, exercises were conducted off Nova Scotia and the crew was given training in extinguishing shipboard fires. The ship held an open house, in observance of Navy Day, in Portland .

In November 1945, Bordelon returned to Norfolk to prepare for a trip to Japan . With seven other Radar Pickets, (Believe to be: Goodrich 831, Hanson 832, Herbert J Thomas 833, Turner 834, Charles P Cecil 835, Leary 879 and Furse 882), she transited the Panama Canal en route to San Diego to load supplies. After several days in Pearl Harbor, the eight destroyers continued toward Japan . On the way, a typhoon was encountered and the SP radar antenna had to be secured, as the rotation motors were unable to control the heavy antenna. At one point the Bordelon was rolled 54 degrees. Surviving the typhoon, they reached Yokosuka with less than a day's supply of fuel.

After Christmas, the ships went to Kure , Japan for repairs from the tender, Vulcan. The storm had lifted the forward 5" gun mount of the Bordelon and the rotation gears had been crushed. After repairs, the eight destroyers joined the Navy's first peacetime task force and then spent many days in training between Guam and Saipan . The first mission of Task Force 77 was to make an official call on the port of Hong Kong . Following a week in Hong Kong the ships went up the Yangtze River, into the Wangpoo River , to Shanghai for a week of liberty. In May 1946, the Bordelon, along with the Brinkley Bass DD 887, the Vesole DD 878, the Leary DD 879, the Dyess DD 880 and others, was engaged in maneuvers, torpedo runs, and tactical exercises. In late June the Task Force was sent to Manila to take part in Philippine Independence Day.

In Jan. of 1947 Bordelon returned to the Atlantic Fleet as her home-port was shifted to Newport , Rhode Island . During April 1947 she was in Brooklyn Navy Yard and then undertook northern European cruises, operating out of Plymouth , England for 6 months as part of the Northern European Task Force. In 1949 she operated along the East Coast of the U.S. and then made another Mediterranean cruise. In Sept., along with the USS Stribling, the USS Juneau and USS Columbia, the Bordelon entered the port at El Ferroll , Spain . This marked the first official visit by USN ships to Spain in over 20 years. In Nov. the Bordelon, with Vesole, Leary and Dyess, took part in a cold weather cruise as part of a task fleet in the North Atlantic, crossed the Arctic Circle and all hands received the Order of The Blue Nose.

On May 3,1950 the Bordelon left Norfolk for Lisbon , Portugal to again become part of the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean Sea . After various port visits and fleet exercises, Bordelon left Suda Bay , Crete on July 19, for Trieste , Italy . Transit of the Adriatic Sea was made at nine knots, in a narrow swept channel, due to the minefield remaining from WWII and, it was said, from WWI. On occasion mines, which had broken loose from their moorings, were observed floating on the surface. Upon being shot by the gunners, these mines usually sank rather than exploded. Bordelon arrived in Trieste on July 23 and stayed for ten days to support the Allied forces of the U.S. and Great Britain , who occupied the city, along with Russia . August 3rd through the 8th was spent in Venice, from which a quick return could be made to Trieste . After more port visits and maneuvers, Bordelon sailed into Orinca Bay , Sardinia , on Sept. 22 to meet the relieving ships and depart the Sixth Fleet, headed for home.

To celebrate the 4th of July 1951, Bordelon held open house in New Bedford , MA . During Aug and Sept., as part of DesRon 4, she hosted a group of ROTC Midshipman on their annual training cruise to Guantanamo Bay . Returning to the Mediterranean in Jan. 1952, Bordelon met the homeward bound ships in Gibraltar . In March, after various port visits and exercises, including "Grand Slam" in Feb., the starboard propeller struck a submerged object, causing the shaft to vibrate. Bordelon entered an English dry dock in Malta, the propeller was replaced and the rudder was repaired. After a visit to Istanbul and then, Bari , Italy , Bordelon was one of the first American ships to make a post-war port visit to Yugoslavia . Visiting Split in April, the officers and crew entertained a group from the embassy in Belgrade and the senior class of the Yugoslavian Naval Academy , as well as the children from the local orphanage. After visiting Trieste and Venice , she sailed to Gibraltar to be relieved by the incoming ships and returned to Norfolk .

In April 1953 Bordelon again went to the Med. In Oct., shortly before she was to return to the states, Bordelon hit a submerged log while backing to a refueling pier, in Caligliaria, Sardinia . This time there was extensive damage to the port propeller. A diver reported one blade with about 10 inches broken off and the tips of the other blades bent from 20 to 30 degrees. Bordelon limped to Gibraltar at 8 knots for repairs at an English dry-dock, and then sailed for home.

In Dec. 1953 Bordelon served as one of two Presidential guard ships to cover the route of the president on the way to the Big Three Conference in Bermuda . In 1954, Bordelon entered the Navy Yard at Norfolk and the after tripod mast was removed. A new height finding radar was installed with an antenna on an after-deck house. The 40 mm guns were replaced by 3" 50s.

From 1956 through 1959 Bordelon was deployed with the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean three times and took part in two Northern European cruises. During this period Bordelon was awarded the coveted Battle Efficiency "E" and the ship's home-port was shifted to Charleston , South Carolina . The 1958 cruise enabled the crew to visit the World's Fair in Brussels , Belgium . The summer of 1959 saw the Bordelon evaluating new electronic gear that had been installed. From 1959 to 1963 Bordelon was again deployed with the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean , and participated in most of the Second Fleet and NATO air defense exercises that were conducted to develop new techniques of fleet anti-air warfare.

In February 1962, the Bordelon participated in "Project Mercury" and the recovery of LTCOL John Glenn and his Mercury spacecraft from a US Manned Orbital Flight. Bordelon also participated in the Cuban Quarantine Operation from Oct to Dec 1962. In Feb.1963, Bordelon entered the Charleston Naval Yard to undergo a Navy program designed to extend the useful life of many of the ships constructed during WW II.

As part of this Force Reconstruction and Modernization, (FRAM 1), the earlier bridge with the portholed inner wheelhouse was replaced with the roomier, single structure with full windows (with windshield wipers in front of the Captain's and OOD's chairs). This bridge added a lot of windage and slowed her down to approx. 27 knots, but in heavy seas the squadron FRAM II "Allen Sumner’s, "James C Owens" (DD776) and "Strong" (DD758) would be forced to slow down to protect their older style bridge. Two ASW torpedo tubes replaced Mount 52 and the handling room became the forward officer's country. Bordelon received improved radar, sonar and communication gear. Amidships was mounted the ASROC launcher. Aft of the second stack was the ASROC magazine/DASH hanger. 4th Div bunked in the hanger bay. Above the hanger stood an ECM room with the array on a tower/mast.

Sonar Control was moved from below the mess decks to port side behind CIC. The compartment below the mess decks was expanded and housed OC, OI and S Divisions. The sonar equipment (twice as much as in 1952) was moved to an air-conditioned compartment, port side of the compartment just forward of the mess decks, and one deck down. The starboard side housed the 3rd Div Sonar Techs and ASROC GMs.

Bordelon was re-designated as a DD, and re-assigned to Desron Four. Jan. 1965 saw her off to the Med. and the Red Sea . In July and August she was off the coast of Santo Domingo during the insurrection there. Oct. 1965 saw her in New York City for the Worlds Fair. In August 1966 she participated in the North Sea N ATO Operation, "Straight Laced". After this operation, the ship visited Wilhelmshaven , Germany . The ship again deployed to the Mediterranean from Oct 1966 to Jan 1967. During Dec. 1966, she participated in the search and rescue operation for the victims of the stricken Greek ferry Heraklion.

Bordelon put into the Charleston Naval Yard for overhaul in the spring of 1967. Bordelon participated in the Vietnam conflict, as part of the US Seventh Fleet, while deployed to the Western Pacific from November 1967 to June 1968. The ship fired her first shots at an enemy, after twenty-two years of commissioned service, on 20 January 1968, while participating in Operation "Sea Dragon". In addition to Sea Dragon, Bordelon saw action on the gun-line near the demilitarized zone, delivering 5,700 rounds of ammunition and the ship was credited with inflicting considerable damage upon the enemy, so much so, that she became known as "The Bloody B". Bordelon operated with carriers on Yankee Station, rescuing four aviators and participating in the rescue of another in the Tonkin Gulf, and rescuing a landing craft from hostile enemy waters. For her outstanding performance in combat on this deployment, the Secretary of the Navy awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation the Bordelon.

After returning to Charleston , Bordelon participated in NATO operation " Silver Tower " off Norway . The ship visited Amsterdam upon completion of the exercise. In 1969 she again deployed to the Mediterranean, and in 1970 she was to be in the Middle East . Leaving Charleston in February, Bordelon crossed the equator and sailed around the Cape of Good Hope . Rounding the Cape , the ship was pounded by 40-ft seas, resulting in a 6-foot crack in the hull. This was repaired at the next port but the compartment that was flooded contained the ship's entire supply of toilet paper. Letters from home took on a new importance. While in the mid east, Bordelon was a back up recovery vessel for Apollo 13, along with the USS Vesole. In 1971 she operated with several South American navies as part of UNITAS XII, visiting 6 So. American countries and 17 ports, plus the Canal Zone and returning to Charleston to complete her 27th year of active service.

In late January 1972, Bordelon deployed to Guantanamo Bay , Cuba assigned to "Operation Johnny Express" She escorted freighters past Cuba for approximately 30 days. One evening, Bordelon received a distress call from the USS Beacon, PG99 which had collided with a small freighter, was on fire and flooding. Maneuvering in 12-14 foot seas, Bordelon put men and equipment aboard Beacon and kept her afloat. During this activity, Bordelon and Beacon collided and Bordelon sustained a 4-foot diameter hole in her port bow. Bordelon was able to tow Beacon until a fleet tug could take over and Bordelon returned to Gitmo for repairs and resumed her mission several days later.

Returning to the Western Pacific in Oct. 1972, Bordelon participated in Operation Linebacker, one of the heaviest Naval actions in the Vietnam War. At one point, Bordelon lost her starboard turbine while shelling targets, leaving her exposed to enemy fire from 8" guns. With luck and cover fire from the USS Lawrence, Bordelon was able to withdraw with minimal damage. Bordelon went to Subic Bay to replace her turbine, fighting heavy typhoon seas while being able to make about 10 knots.

After the cease-fire, she left the Seventh Fleet on 12 March 1973, after serving in the Western Pacific for 121 days, and arrived home in Charleston , SC on 5 April 1973. CDR Carmody said the ship had steamed 40,000 miles and fired 4,000 rounds. The Bordelon participated in six strikes against the enemy and had a few thousand rounds fired at it by coastal defense forces. The ship also provided group support to forces in S. Vietnam and performed search and rescue duties on Yankee Station for aircraft.

Bordelon was in Charleston most of 1973. In August she did a pier side rebuild of many of her mechanicals. Ship's fuel system was converted from Black Oil to JP5. She sat at the pier during the Seven Days War in the Middle East and went from 6 section duty down to 3 sections. Armed guards were on the quarterdeck as well as a roving armed deck guard. She also participated in Atlantic Ready Exercise in early December, 73 with a short Liberty Call at Roosevelt Roads

In July of '74, although scheduled to return to the Med., the Bordelon was sent on a Central American tour as part of UNITAS XV. This included 5 days in Rio De Janeiro and a trip through the Straits of Magellan.

In April 1975, while re-fueling, the Bordelon collided with the USS Seattle AOE 3, resulting in only minor damage. Again in the Mediterranean in Oct. Bordelon completed anti-submarine operations in the Ionian Sea and rejoined the Task Force based on USS John F. Kennedy. During nighttime maneuvers in Nov., the Kennedy collided with the cruiser, USS Belknap CG 26. The USS Claude Ricketts, DDG 5, was ordered alongside upwind, to fight the amidships fire on Belknap. When it was realized that little progress was being made with the fire, Bordelon was ordered alongside Belknap, downwind in the flame and smoke, to direct water on the area where no one else could reach. Cdr. George Pierce held Bordelon within 15 feet of the side of Belknap -in open seas- until the fires were brought under control. Bordelon then towed Belknap to Augusta Bay, Sicily and aided the Belknap crew with repairs for three days. The holiday period was spent in Palermo , Sicily .

During the summer of 1976, Bordelon participated in the USS Independence's ORI (Operational Readiness Inspection) and deployed to northern Europe as part of the largest maritime NATO exercise to date, "Teamwork 76". On 14 Sept., while refueling alongside the USS John F. Kennedy, the ships came together and collided. The Bordelon's port bow and some of the superstructure were damaged and the main mast snapped and fell on the signal shack, injuring some of the handling team.

Bordelon, escorted by USS Brumby FF 1044, sailed to the Devonport Royal Navy Yard in Plymouth, England . After 11 days getting repairs and a Pathfinder navigation radar, Bordelon, in company with the USS Kalamazoo AOR 6 and USS Luce DDG 38, proceeded under her own power to Charleston , SC.

On Jan 6th, 1977 XO George Ellis relieved CDR George Pierce. Due to the damage to the superstructure and electronics and the age and condition of the hull, the Bordelon was de-commissioned on Feb. 1, 1977. Cdr. Pierce was cleared of blame during the post-collision inquiry and later commanded the USS Cone DD 866.

Towed to Philadelphia by the USS Shakori ATF 162, the ex-Bordelon was stripped of usable equipment. Iran bought the remains, for boiler system parts, and had the hull towed to Iran . It was later sunk as a target.

Bordelon was deployed 26 times and received 2 Meritorious Unit Commendations


Timeline: An Extraordinary Life

Education:
Sonora Grade School, Sonora, Kentucky, 1937–1946
Passed G.E.D. test in U.S. Navy, 1960
Attended Charles County Community College, Great Mills, Maryland, 1980–1982
Attended Tidewater Community College, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 1983

Died on July 25, 2006, in Portsmouth, Virginia

Dates of Navy Rates

Seaman Recruit (E-1) through Boatswain’s Mate First Class (E-6), 1948–1955
Chief Boatswain’s Mate (E-7), 1960–1966
Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate (E-8), 1966–1971
Master Chief Boatswain’s Mate (E-9), 1971–1979

Dates of Navy Diving Specialties

Salvage Diver, 1954–1960
Second Class Diver, 1960–1964
First Class Diver, 1964–1970
Saturation Diver, 1970–1979
Master Diver, 1970–1979

Navy Decorations and Medals

Good Conduct Medal (eight awards)
Navy Commendation Medal
Navy Achievement Medal
National Defense Service Medal
China Service Medal
Korean Service Medal
United Nations Medal
Navy and Marine Corps Medal
Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
Presidential Unit Citation
Navy Occupation Service Medal

Dates of Navy Service

February 25, 1948
Enlisted in the U.S. Navy

February–May 1948
Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Illinois
Recruit Training

May 1948–June 1950
Experimental Squadron One, Key West, Florida
Officers’ Mess PBM Beachmaster Unit

June 1950–November 1951
USS Palau (CVE 122)
Deck Division Motor Whaleboat Coxswain

November 1951–March 1955
USS Tripoli (CVE 64)
Second Division Petty Officer Master-at-Arms Temporary Additional Duty at Salvage Diving School

March 1955–June 1956
USS Opportune (ARS 41)
Deck Division Salvage Diver Section Leader Repair Party Leader

June 1956–June 1958
Naval Air Station, Quonset Point, Rhode Island
Leading Petty Officer Salvage Diver Escort for President Dwight D. Eisenhower

June 1958–July 1960
Ship Repair Facility, Guam, Marianas Islands
Salvage Diver Skipper of Yard Salvage Derrick

July–September 1960
Deep Sea Diving School, Washington, D.C.
Student, failed the first class diving course

September 1960–March 1961
USS Nereus (AS 17)
Deck Division Chief Boatswain’s Mate

March 1961–April 1962
Fleet Training Center, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
Chief Master-at-Arms Requalified as Second Class Diver Temporary Additional Duty with Joint Task Force Eight

April 1962–October 1963
USS Coucal (ASR 8)
Ship’s Chief Boatswain’s Mate Second Class Diver Underway Officer of the Deck In-Port Duty Chief

October 1963–June 1964
Deep Sea Diving School, Washington, D.C.
Student, graduated as First Class Diver

June 1964–September 1965
USS Shakori (ATF 162)
Ship’s Chief Boatswain’s Mate Leading Diver Underway Officer of the Deck

September 1965–March 1966
USS Hoist (ARS 40)
Ship’s Chief Boatswain’s Mate Acting Master Diver Underway Officer of the Deck Repair Party Leader In-Port Duty Chief

May 1966–March 1967
Naval Regional Medical Center, Portsmouth, Virginia
Treatment following the amputation of left leg below the knee

March 1967–March 1968
Harbor Clearance Unit Two
Under Evaluation at Diving School for return to full active duty and diving

March 1968–December 1969
Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Virginia
Leading Chief Petty Officer Leading Diver

December 1969–June 1970
Navy Experimental Diving Unit, Deep Sea Diving School, Washington, D.C.
Saturation Diver Master Diver Evaluation

June 1970–May 1971
USS Hunley (AS 31)
Master Diver R-7 Division Officer In-Port Officer of the Deck Minority Affairs Officer

May 1971–June 1975
USS Recovery (ARS 43)
Master Diver Work Center Supervisor Command Master Chief Repair Party Leader Underway Officer of the Deck In-Port Command Duty Officer

June 1975–June 1977
Naval Safety Center, Norfolk, Virginia
Master Diver

June 1977–October 1978
USS Recovery (ARS 43)
Master Diver Work Center Supervisor Command Master Chief Enlisted Watch Officer Repair Party Leader Underway Officer of the Deck In-Port Command Duty Officer

October 1978–March 1979
Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity, Norfolk, Virginia
Master Diver

April 1, 1979
Retired from the U.S. Navy as a master chief petty officer and master diver

Dates of Civilian Employment Following Navy Retirement

April 1979–August 1980
QED Systems, Inc., Virginia Beach, Virginia
Diving Study for the Royal Saudi Navy USS Forrestal (CV 59) Service Life Extension Program

February–November 1982
CDI Marine Company, Chesapeake, Virginia
Engineering Specialist

November 1982–January 1993
Naval Communication Area Master Station Atlantic, Norfolk, Virginia
Environmental Protection Specialist Energy Conservation Specialist


Shakori ATF-162 - History

Descendants of Elizabeth Jane Blalock

This information is courtesy of George Akins.

This page is owned by Barbara Woolbright Carruth.

Descendants of ELIZABETH Jane Blalock

1. ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK (JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 1849 in AL, and died Unknown. She married JOHN M . A KINS 23 August 1874 in Sanford Co., AL (became Lamar Co. 1877). He was born Bet. 1850 - 1952 in MS, and died Bet. 1891 - 1900 in Pine Springs, Lamar Co., AL.

Notes for ELIZABETH J ANE B LALOCK :

1850 US Census of Monroe Co., MS, household #512-531

Blaylock, John H. 22 male b. GA

1870 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Smithville PO, pg. 38, dwelling 255, family 282, enumerated 20 Jul 1870, Roll 741, bk 1

Blalock, John aged 45yrs w m 415 600 SC Farmer abt 1825

Malinda aged 42yrs w f AL abt 1828

>>Jane<< aged 20yrs w f MS abt 1850

Green aged 18yrs w m MS abt 1852

Elizabeth aged 16yrs w f MS abt 1854

Nancy aged 14yrs w f MS abt 1856

Mary aged 12yrs w f MS abt 1858

William aged 6yrs w m MS abt 1864

James aged 3yrs w m MS abt 1867

1880 US Census, Lamar Co., AL, p. 4, ED # 129, T13, Range 16, Pine Springs Beat # 7, p. 4, dwelling #27, enumerated 9 Jun 1880

Achan, John M. m aged 28yrs head MS blank blank farmer

Jane f aged 30yrs wife AL blank blank house keeper

Fannie f aged 3yrs dau AL MS AL

Malinda f aged 2yrs dau AL MS AL

James W. m aged 11/12yrs son AL MS AL

1900 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 46, sheet 1, house #2, line 4, enumerated by W.C. Evans. Date of enumeration 2 Jun 1900 entered on next page

(This is where I got the L for her middle name, gma)

Akin, Jane L.<< head Oct 1849 51 WD pb AL fapb MS mopb AL Farmer

James W. son Jun 1880 20 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Della N. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Ella M. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Emily C. dau Jul 1887 13 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Henry B. son Apr 1889 11 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Rody J. dau May 1892 9 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Census shows that Jane is widowed, had been married 23 yrs, had 7 children of which 6 are still living. James and Emily were the only two that could read in the family.

Janes brother James D. Blalock lives next door to her with his wife Dora, and dau Ida.

Note: This 1900 Census says that Jane has had 7 children and that 6 are still living. There are 6 listed in this Census living with her now. She would have had to had 8 children because the 1880 Census shows that James W. has 2 older sisters, Fannie & Malinda. I have 8 children for her in my files. Six are listed here, Bettie is married, Fannie would be dead. James W. is the only child listed that was on the 1880 Census. gma

Jane is listed Elizabeth Blaylock on the 1850 Census of Monroe Co., MS, and as Jane L. Akins in the 1900 Census of Lamar Co. AL. Maybe the L. could have been short for Lisabeth.

Http://www.clark.net/pub/jcblal/altree6.html, 2/20/1999, by Jessie Blalock, shows her full name as Elizabeth Jane Blalock.

Email from Barbara Carruth, [email protected], dtd 20 Feb 1999 to me, said her name was Nancy Jane Blalock Akins.

Barbara got the Nancy from Denise Gregory in OK and she told me that Greg Green has her first name as Elizabeth.

More About ELIZABETH J ANE B LALOCK :

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

The 1870 census shows John as 20 and the 1880 census shows him as 28yrs making him born

30 Jul 1870 - 1870 Census of Sanford Co., AL, 378, was enumerated: Inhabitants in T14, Range 16, Post Office Vernon, AL & Caledonia,MS,

Mize, Robert male age 28 born AL working on farm

Telitha female age 27 born MS keeping house

John R. male age 7 born MS at home

Wm. Z male age 4 born MS at home

Samantha female age 1 born MS at home

Gallop Drusilla female age 20 born MS Domestic Servant

" Frances L female age 2 born AL at home

<<Ackens, John>>>> male age 20 born MS working on farm

Sloan, Samuel male age 35 born SC farmer

James male age 55 born SC working on farm

Willis male age 27 born SC

Elisabeth female age 45 born SC

Marya ? female age 44 born SC

Jane female age 26 born AL

Mary female age 21 born AL

1880 US Census, Lamar Co., AL, p. 4, ED # 129, T13, Range 16, Pine Springs Beat # 7, p. 4, dwelling #27, enumerated 9 Jun 1880

Achan, John M. m aged 28yrs head MS blank blank farmer

Jane f aged 30yrs wife AL blank blank house keeper

Fannie f aged 3yrs dau AL MS AL

Malinda f aged 2yrs dau AL MS AL

James W. m aged 11/12yrs son AL MS AL

1900 Census of Lamar Co., AL that was enumerated on 2 Jun 1900, shows Jane Akins with children and John M. is deceased. He died after 1891 before 2 June 1900.

In 1965 I had to make a family tree in high school so I went to the oldest family member I knew. I only knew her as Big Ma. Her name was Mattie Lona (MCGARRH) MAY. She was the mother to grandpa Benjamin Henry Akins wife, Lilliebell. Big Ma gave me a lot more information than I wanted back then. I only wish I had written down every thing she told me. She told me that Ben Henrys' father, John AKINS, was an Indian orphan raised by a family in Alabama. She told me that he also had a sister in Mississippi. It was many years later when my parents were moving and I was up in the old attic and found all the information that I had written for that project in high school. Being much older it took me back to memories of Big Ma and sparked my interest in my families history. This is the result.

2 Mar 1981 letter to my brother, John T. Akins Jr., 106 Sherwood Ave., Sherwood, AR 72116 from Fleta Camp Palmer, Greenwood Springs, MS 38848. Transcribed as written. Copy in my possession. gma

Since there is no one else to get any of this fixed & back to you I'll do what I can. Myrtis is not able to do anything & can't write. Her girl lives in Birmingham, Ala & didn't have time to fix it, her son don't write. I am Ella's girl. Me & Myrtis is the only Akins family that live in this community. Alice, Della's girl, is in the hospital. Ida, Bettie's girl is in Hospital. They both have been there good while, all the rest is dead or live away off. I'll use a red pencil and mark an X by the names that is dead. I have put down all the Akins children & the one they married. We don't have any way knowing their age, we don't have any way to know the grand children of all of them. The Ray Children, Sarah Family & her brothers & a few more meet at Myrtis on 2nd Sun in May, they might could tell you some of the grand children if you want them. If you don't get to come & you want the grand children, I'll try to get them if you will let me no. Yes, Lula is almost blind, she can't do anything much. She been in Oxford since first of January at her daughters, part of time in Hospital down there. She is 78 yrs old, I'll be 75 in April. Myrtis is 84 I think. You see, we are not no spring chickens, Ha. My Husband Edd Parents are buried in another cemetery several miles from here, an the 2nd Sunday also, we had already planed to meet his sister that lives a long ways from here at that cemetery, but if you all come we will see you maybe.

X Bettie Akins X Monroe Ray

X Wesley Ray Mirtis Pickle

X Willie Ray Margie Pucket

Sarah Ray X Jack Northington

X James Ray Jamie Netherly

Ida Ray X Leck Northington

Fannie Akins These 2 died as teenagers

X Della Akins Charlie Camp

Alice Camp X Levi Northington

X Ella Akins X Benton Camp

X Emily Akins X Bill Irvin

Gurnie Irvin Clifford Brassfield

Burnie Irvin X Chap Faulkner

X Rody Akins X Asker Lowery

X Birtie Lowery & brother X J. T. Lowery

Geneva Lowery Robert Coffie

I'll put an X by each name that dead

Mailed in the same envelope as Fleta was this letter from Mrs. J. C. "Lula" Pickle, Brasfield Terrace Apt. 33, Amory, MS 38821.

Lost my eyesight, I will try to write you a few lines. I can not see what I write. I was so glad to hear from you. I was afraid we would never hear from any of you. I don't live at the home place now. My husband died in 69 so I have lived in Amory ever since. My address is

13 Apr 1981 letter to my brother, John T. Akins Jr., 106 Sherwood Ave., Sherwood, AR 72116 from Fleta Camp Palmer, Greenwood Springs, MS 38848. Transcribed as written.

I have got some ages for you, and also a negative for a picture. Me & Lula borried an old picture from Mirt Ray and had us one each made. Its 5x7 and it's real good. We thought you would like to have a picture. Aunt Billie Ray is not on it. The ones in the picture, front row is from left, Della Akins Camp, Wess Ray in the little chair, Jane grandma Akins, standing behind little chair is Henry Akins, back row left, Rhoda Jane Akins Lowery, Emily Akins Irvin, James Akins, Mary Ella on right. I'll put in the ages Birnie mailed me. I thought I'd go ahead & mail it that I might not get to see you all when you come, and so you can get your picture made.

Fannie Ariazine Akins July 4th 1875

Bettie Malinda Akins Jan 25th 1877

Mary Ella & Nancy Della (Twins) Akins Oct 31st 1882 both married Camp

Emily Akins Irvin April 12th 1886

Rhoda Jane Akins Lowery April 11th 1881

Emily Akins Nov. 3, 1903 married W.Z. "Bill" Irvin

My brother Tom and I went to an AKINS Family Reunion at the BLALOCK Cemetery that is held every year on Mothers Day. It is a well-kept cemetery. There is not a grave marker for John AKINS and Jane (BLALOCK) AKINS, only a funeral home marker. One of the older family members told us that they rewrote the paper in the little metal marker on their graves each year so they would always know who was buried there.

We talked to some of the oldest relatives to see what we could learn about John Akins. They told us that that John AKINS lived with a man named SLOAN and worked on the farm with him. We were also told that Jim AKINS, Ben Henrys' brother, died of TB. The Post Office of Lamar Co. was on the state line of Vernon, AL and Caledonia, MS.

Tom and I went to the court house of Sanford County in Alabama and found the Marriage

License of John M. AKINS and Jane BLALOCK dated 23 August 1874. The license shows they

were married at John H. BLALOCK, Jane's' father. John M. AKINS and Samuel SLOAN signed the bond.

11 Sep 1999 I called Rayburn Blaylock and asked him about a statement made in the Blalock Cemetery list that he and his wife transcribed of all the headstones. He stated that John Akins' father and mother were buried in the family plot with John and Elizabeth Jane (Blalock) Akins. He told me that he got the information from his cousin that cared for the cemetery.

More About JOHN M . A KINS :

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery Lamar Co., AL

Census 1: 30 July 1870, 1870 US Census, Sanford Co., AL, 378, Inhabitants in T14, Range 16, Post Office Vernon, AL & Caledonia, MS, enumerated 30 Jul 1870

Census 2: 09 June 1880, 1880 US Census, Lamar Co., AL, p. 4, ED # 129, T13, Range 16, Pine Springs Beat # 7, p. 4, dwelling #27, enumerated 9 Jun 1880

Census 3: 02 June 1900, 1900 Census of Lamar Co., AL, enumerated on 2 Jun 1900, shows Jane Akins widowed with children and John M. is deceased. He died after 1891 before 2 June 1900.

Places lived: Stanford Co, AL, Lamar Co., AL

Marriage Notes for ELIZABETH B LALOCK and JOHN A KINS :

They were married in the home of her father, John H. Blalock, by R.G. Evans, a Justice of the Peace. Samuel Sloan was one of the witnesses. It is possible that R.G. Evans is Janes Brother, William Hastin Blalock, wife, Eliz Ann "Lila" EVANS' father, Richard Green EVANS, he was a JP.

Children of ELIZABETH B LALOCK and JOHN A KINS are:

i. FANNIE ARIZINE9 AKINS, b. 04 July 1875, AL d. Unknown, died before 1900 Census, Lamar Co., AL, died a teenager, Lamar Co., AL.

Notes for FANNIE ARIZINE AKINS:

1880 US Census, Lamar Co., AL, p. 4, ED # 129, T13, Range 16, Pine Springs Beat # 7, p. 4, dwelling #27, enumerated 9 Jun 1880

Achan, John M. m aged 28yrs head MS blank blank farmer

Jane f aged 30yrs wife AL blank blank house keeper

Fannie f aged 3yrs dau AL MS AL

Malinda f aged 2yrs dau AL MS AL

James W. m aged 11/12yrs son AL MS AL

2. ii. BETTIE MALINDA AKINS, b. 25 January 1877, AL source: Fleta (Camp) Palmer 4/13/1981 d. 16 March 1944.

iii. JAMES W. "JIM" AKINS, b. 22 June 1879, AL d. Unknown, still living on 1900 Lamar Co., Census. Lamar Co., AL.

Notes for JAMES W. "JIM" AKINS:

In a photo I have of him standing with his family, he towers over them. He must have been 6'4" to 6'6" tall.

1880 US Census, Lamar Co., AL, p. 4, ED # 129, T13, Range 16, Pine Springs Beat # 7, p. 4, dwelling #27, enumerated 9 Jun 1880

Achan, John M. m aged 28yrs head MS blank blank farmer

Jane f aged 30yrs wife AL blank blank house keeper

Fannie f aged 3yrs dau AL MS AL

Malinda f aged 2yrs dau AL MS AL

James W. m aged 11/12yrs son AL MS AL

1900 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 46, sheet 1, house #2, line 4, enumerated by W.C. Evans.

Akin, Jane L. head Oct 1849 51 WD pb AL fapb MS mopb AL Farmer

>>>James W. son Jun 1880 20 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Della N. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Ella M. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Emily C. dau Jul 1887 13 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Henry B. son Apr 1889 11 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Rody J. dau May 1892 9 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

3. iv. NANCY DELLA (TWIN) AKINS, b. 31 October 1882, Lamar Co., AL d. 31 August 1962.

4. v. MARY ELLA (TWIN) AKINS, b. 31 October 1882, Lamar Co., AL d. 23 February 1973, Gilmory Hospital, Armory, MS.

5. vi. EMILY C. AKINS, b. 12 April 1886, AL d. 05 August 1959.

6. vii. BENJAMIN HENRY "BEN" AKINS, b. 14 August 1888, Sulligent, Lamar Co., AL d. 10 March 1958, VA Hosp. Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.

7. viii. RHODA JANE AKINS, b. 11 April 1891, AL d. Bef. April 1981.

2. B ETTIE M ALINDA 9 A KINS (ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 25 January 1877 in AL source: Fleta (Camp) Palmer 4/13/1981, and died 16 March 1944. She married J AMES M ONROE R AY Bef. 1896, son of J ASPER R AY and S ARAH I RVIN . He was born 22 January 1872 in Monroe Co., MS, and died 11 September 1950 in Lamar Co., AL.

Notes for B ETTIE M ALINDA A KINS :

1880 US Census, Lamar Co., AL, p. 4, ED # 129, T13, Range 16, Pine Springs Beat # 7, p. 4, dwelling #27, enumerated 9 Jun 1880

Achan, John M. m aged 28yrs head MS blank blank farmer

Jane f aged 30yrs wife AL blank blank house keeper

Fannie f aged 3yrs dau AL MS AL

>>>Malinda f aged 2yrs dau AL MS AL

James W. m aged 11/12yrs son AL MS AL

1910 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 60, p. 53B, enumerated 15 Apr 1910, Roll 20, Bk 3, family 13

Ray, Monroe Hd M W 36yrs md 14yrs MS AL MS Saw Mill

>>>Bettie wife F W 32yrs md 14yrs AL AL MS abt 1878

Wesley son M W 12yrs s AL MS AL

Willie son M W 10yrs s AL MS AL

Geans? son M W 7yrs s AL MS AL

Sarah dau F W 5yrs s AL MS AL

Ida dau F W 4yrs s AL MS AL

Roy son M W 2yrs s AL MS AL

Qunie dau F W 8/12yrs s AL MS AL b. abt Oct 1909

This Census shows that Betty has had 7 children, and that all 7 are still living.

1920 US Census, Monroe Co., Pickle Prec., ED 59, sh 7a, enumerated on 22nd & 27th of Jan 1920, by E.C. Dreskell, ln, 31, dwelling 48, family 50

Ray, Willie D. head w m aged 19yrs md MS MS AL laborer public works abt 1901

Margie A. wife w f aged 17yrs md MS MS MS abt 1903

Ray, J. Monroe head w m aged 48yrs md MS GA MS farmer abt 1872

>>>Bettie wife w f aged 42yrs md AL AL AL abt 1876

Sarah dau w f aged 15yrs s MS MS AL abt 1905

Ida Bell dau w f aged 13yrs s MS MS AL abt 1907

Roy son w s aged 9yrs s MS MS AL abt 1911

Lillian dau w f aged 7yrs s MS MS AL abt 1913

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 5a, Bk 1, p. 108a, ln 11, dwelling 84, family 84, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Ray, Monroe head m w aged 50yrs md at 21yrs MS MS MS farmer

Bettie wife f w aged 50yrs md at 17yrs AL AL AL

Roy son m w aged 19yrs s AL AL AL

Ervin, Lillian dau f w aged 17yrs md at 17yrs MS AL AL

More About B ETTIE M ALINDA A KINS :

Name 2: Bettie L. Akins source: shown on her headstone

Date born 2: 07 January 1884, AL source: Headstone Inscription, Blalock Cemetery, AL,

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

Notes for J AMES M ONROE R AY :

1910 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 60, p. 53B, enumerated 15 Apr 1910, Roll 20, Bk 3, family 13

Ray, Monroe Hd M W 36yrs md 14yrs MS AL MS Saw Mill md. abt 1896

Bettie wife F W 32yrs md 14yrs AL AL MS b. abt 1878

Wesley son M W 12yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1898

Willie son M W 10yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1900

Geans? son M W 7yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1903

Sarah dau F W 5yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1905

Ida dau F W 4yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1906

Roy son M W 2yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1908

Qunie dau F W 8/12yrs s AL MS AL b. abt Oct 1909

This Census shows that Betty has had 7 children, and that all 7 are still living.

1920 Census, Monroe Co., Pickle Prec., ED 59, sh 7a, enumerated on 22nd & 27th of Jan 1920, by E.C. Dreskell, ln, 31, dwelling 48, family 50

Ray, Willie D. head w m aged 19yrs md MS MS AL laborer public works abt 1901

Margie A. wife w f aged 17yrs md MS MS MS abt 1903

Ray, J. Monroe head w m aged 48yrs md MS GA MS farmer abt 1872

Bettie wife w f aged 42yrs md AL AL AL abt 1876

Sarah dau w f aged 15yrs s MS MS AL abt 1905

Ida Bell dau w f aged 13yrs s MS MS AL abt 1907

Roy son w s aged 9yrs s MS MS AL abt 1911

Lillian dau w f aged 7yrs s MS MS AL abt 1913

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 5a, Bk 1, p. 108a, ln 11, dwelling 84, family 84, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Ray, Monroe head m w aged 50yrs md at 21yrs MS MS MS farmer

Bettie wife f w aged 50yrs md at 17yrs AL AL AL

Roy son m w aged 19yrs s AL AL AL

Ervin, Lillian dau f w aged 17yrs md at 17yrs MS AL AL

More About J AMES M ONROE R AY :

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

Children of B ETTIE A KINS and J AMES R AY are:

8. i. JAMES WESLEY "WESS"10 RAY, b. 17 May 1896, AL d. 13 July 1980.

ii. WILLIE RAY, b. Abt. 1900, AL d. Unknown m. MARGIE PUCKETT b. Abt. 1903, MS d. Unknown, Still living Mar 1981.

Notes for WILLIE RAY:

1910 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 60, p. 53B, enumerated 15 Apr 1910, Roll 20, Bk 3, family 13

Ray, Monroe Hd M W 36yrs md 14yrs MS AL MS Saw Mill

Bettie wife F W 32yrs md 14yrs AL AL MS

Wesley son M W 12yrs s AL MS AL

>>Willie<< son M W 10yrs s AL MS AL

Geans? son M W 7yrs s AL MS AL

Sarah dau F W 5yrs s AL MS AL

Ida dau F W 4yrs s AL MS AL

Roy son M W 2yrs s AL MS AL

Qunie dau F W 8/12yrs s AL MS AL b. abt Oct 1909

This Census shows that Betty has had 7 children, and that all 7 are still living.

1920 US Census, Monroe Co., Pickle Prec., ED 59, sh 7a, enumerated on 22nd & 27th of Jan 1920, by E.C. Dreskell, ln, 31, dwelling 48, family 50

Ray, Willie D. head w m aged 19yrs md MS MS AL laborer public works abt 1901

Margie A. wife w f aged 17yrs md MS MS MS abt 1903

Ray, J. Monroe head w m aged 48yrs md MS GA MS farmer abt 1872

Bettie wife w f aged 42yrs md AL AL AL abt 1876

Sarah dau w f aged 15yrs s MS MS AL abt 1905

Ida Bell dau w f aged 13yrs s MS MS AL abt 1907

Roy son w s aged 9yrs s MS MS AL abt 1911

Lillian dau w f aged 7yrs s MS MS AL abt 1913

Notes for MARGIE PUCKETT:

1920 US Census, Monroe Co., Pickle Prec., ED 59, sh 7a, enumerated on 22nd & 27th of Jan 1920, by E.C. Dreskell, ln, 31, dwelling 48, family 50

Ray, Willie D. head w m aged 19yrs md MS MS AL laborer public works abt 1901

Margie A. wife w f aged 17yrs md MS MS MS abt 1903

Ray, J. Monroe head w m aged 48yrs md MS GA MS farmer abt 1872

Bettie wife w f aged 42yrs md AL AL AL abt 1876

Sarah dau w f aged 15yrs s MS MS AL abt 1905

Ida Bell dau w f aged 13yrs s MS MS AL abt 1907

Roy son w s aged 9yrs s MS MS AL abt 1911

Lillian dau w f aged 7yrs s MS MS AL abt 1913

Marriage Notes for WILLIE RAY and MARGIE PUCKETT:

Headstone Inscriptions, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL, compiled by Rayburn Blaylock, Amory, MS, Aug 1991 says that they had twin daughters, and not dates.

iii. JAMES RAY, b. 12 March 1899, AL d. 12 May 1953 m. JAMIE NETHERLY d. Unknown, still living Mar 1981.

Notes for JAMES RAY:

1910 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 60, p. 53B, enumerated 15 Apr 1910, Roll 20, Bk 3, family 13

Ray, Monroe Hd M W 36yrs md 14yrs MS AL MS Saw Mill md. abt 1896

Bettie wife F W 32yrs md 14yrs AL AL MS b. abt

Wesley son M W 12yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1898

Willie son M W 10yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1900

Geans? son M W 7yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1903

Sarah dau F W 5yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1905

Ida dau F W 4yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1906

Roy son M W 2yrs s AL MS AL b. abt 1908

Qunie dau F W 8/12yrs s AL MS AL b. abt Oct 1909

This Census shows that Betty has had 7 children, and that all 7 are still living.

=================================

Barbara Carruth told me in a letter dated 3/12/1999, that Floree King said his name was Jeams.

More About JAMES RAY:

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

9. iv. SARAH JANE RAY, b. 02 September 1907, AL d. 02 February 1986.

v. IDA BELL RAY, b. Abt. 1906, AL d. Unknown, was in the hospital and had been there a while in Mar 1981 m. LECK NORTHINGTON b. 1905 d. 1966.

Notes for IDA BELL RAY:

1910 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 60, p. 53B, enumerated 15 Apr 1910, Roll 20, Bk 3, family 13

Ray, Monroe Hd M W 36yrs md 14yrs MS AL MS Saw Mill

Bettie wife F W 32yrs md 14yrs AL AL MS

Wesley son M W 12yrs s AL MS AL

Willie son M W 10yrs s AL MS AL

Geans? son M W 7yrs s AL MS AL

Sarah dau F W 5yrs s AL MS AL

>>Ida<< dau F W 4yrs s AL MS AL abt 1906

Roy son M W 2yrs s AL MS AL

Qunie dau F W 8/12yrs s AL MS AL b. abt Oct 1909

This Census shows that Betty has had 7 children, and that all 7 are still living.

1920 US Census, Monroe Co., Pickle Prec., ED 59, sh 7a, enumerated on 22nd & 27th of Jan 1920, by E.C. Dreskell, ln, 31, dwelling 48, family 50

Ray, Willie D. head w m aged 19yrs md MS MS AL laborer public works abt 1901

Margie A. wife w f aged 17yrs md MS MS MS abt 1903

Ray, J. Monroe head w m aged 48yrs md MS GA MS farmer abt 1872

Bettie wife w f aged 42yrs md AL AL AL abt 1876

Sarah dau w f aged 15yrs s MS MS AL abt 1905

Ida Bell dau w f aged 13yrs s MS MS AL abt 1907

Roy son w s aged 9yrs s MS MS AL abt 1911

Lillian dau w f aged 7yrs s MS MS AL abt 1913

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 5a, Bk 1, p. 108a, ln 5, dwelling 81, family 81, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Northington, Leck head m w aged 24yrs md at 22yrs AL AL AL Farmer abt 1906

Allie wife f w aged 22yrs md at 20yrs AL MS AL abt 1908

Notes for LECK NORTHINGTON:

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 5a, Bk 1, p. 108a, ln 5, dwelling 81, family 81, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Northington, Leck head m w aged 24yrs md at 22yrs AL AL AL Farmer

Allie wife f w aged 22yrs md at 20yrs AL MS AL

10. vi. ROY REETH RAY, b. 02 September 1907, Monroe Co., MS d. 08 August 1954.

vii. LILLIAN RAY, b. Abt. 1913, MS d. Unknown, still living Mar 1981 m. CLYDE "BILL" IRVIN, Abt. 1930 d. Unknown, still living Mar 1981.

Notes for LILLIAN RAY:

1920 US Census, Monroe Co., Pickle Prec., ED 59, sh 7a, enumerated on 22nd & 27th of Jan 1920, by E.C. Dreskell, ln, 31, dwelling 48, family 50

Ray, Willie D. head w m aged 19yrs md MS MS AL laborer public works abt 1901

Margie A. wife w f aged 17yrs md MS MS MS abt 1903

Ray, J. Monroe head w m aged 48yrs md MS GA MS farmer abt 1872

Bettie wife w f aged 42yrs md AL AL AL abt 1876

Sarah dau w f aged 15yrs s MS MS AL abt 1905

Ida Bell dau w f aged 13yrs s MS MS AL abt 1907

Roy son w s aged 9yrs s MS MS AL abt 1911

Lillian dau w f aged 7yrs s MS MS AL abt 1913

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 5a, Bk 1, p. 108a, ln 11, dwelling 84, family 84, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Ray, Monroe head m w aged 50yrs md at 21yrs MS MS MS farmer

Bettie wife f w aged 50yrs md at 17yrs AL AL AL

Roy son m w aged 19yrs s AL AL AL

Ervin, Lillian dau f w aged 17yrs md at 17yrs MS AL AL

viii. LINDA JANE RAY, d. Unknown.

More About LINDA JANE RAY:

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

3. N ANCY D ELLA (TWIN) 9 A KINS (ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 31 October 1882 in Lamar Co., AL, and died 31 August 1962. She married C HARLIE B . C AMP , son of ? C AMP and L OUVINA ? . He was born 25 June 1858 in AL, and died 20 October 1931.

Notes for N ANCY D ELLA (TWIN) A KINS :

Nancy Della and Mary Ella are twins. They also married brothers Thomas Benton and Charlie B. Camp.

1900 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 46, sheet 1, house #2, line 4, enumerated by W.C. Evans.

Akin, Jane L. head Oct 1849 51 WD pb AL fapb MS mopb AL Farmer

James W. son Jun 1880 20 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

>>>Della N. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Ella M. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Emily C. dau Jul 1887 13 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Henry B. son Apr 1889 11 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Rody J. dau May 1892 9 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

1910 Census of Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 57, family 57, line 51

Camp, Charles Hd M W 46 yrs md 8 yrs AL MS AL Farmer

>>>Della wf F W 30 yrs md 8 yrs AL US MS

Alice dau F W 2 yrs s MS AL AL

Della has had only one child born, and she is still living.

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 5a, Bk 1, p. 108a, ln 7, dwelling 82, family 82, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Camp, Charlie B. head m w aged 67yrs md at 32yrs AL MS AL farmer

Della wife f w aged 48yrs md at 22yrs AL GA MS

More About N ANCY D ELLA (TWIN) A KINS :

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery Lamar Co., AL

Notes for C HARLIE B . C AMP :

1900 US Census, Monro Co., MS, Pickle Vatney Prec., p. 58a, ED 70, enumerated on 1 Jun 1900, house 113

Camp, Charlie B. hd w m b. Apr 1866 aged 34 s AL AL AL farmer

Lovina mo w f b. Jan 1845 aged 55 wd AL SC SC

Thomas B. bro w f b. Feb 1880 aged 20 s MS AL AL farm laborer

Lavina has had 6 children of which 4 are still living.

1910 Census of Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 57, family 57, line 51

Camp, Charles Hd M W 46 yrs md 8 yrs AL MS AL Farmer

Della wf F W 30 yrs md 8 yrs AL US MS

Alice dau F W 2 yrs s MS AL AL

Della has had only one child born, and she is still living.

Couldn't find Charlie B. or Nancy Ella in 1920 US Census for MS or AL

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 5a, Bk 1, p. 108a, ln 7, dwelling 82, family 82, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Camp, Charlie B. head m w aged 67yrs md at 32yrs AL MS AL farmer

Della wife f w aged 48yrs md at 22yrs AL GA MS

More About C HARLIE B . C AMP :

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

Child of N ANCY A KINS and C HARLIE C AMP is:

i. ALICE10 CAMP, b. 27 August 1907 d. 11 February 1984 m. LEVI NORTHINGTON b. 20 May 1903 d. 24 February 1974.

Notes for ALICE CAMP:

1910 Census of Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 57, family 57, line 51

Camp, Charles Hd M W 46 yrs md 8 yrs AL MS AL Farmer

Della wf F W 30 yrs md 8 yrs AL US MS

Alice dau F W 2 yrs s MS AL AL

Della has had only one child born, and she is still living.

Fleta (Camp) Palmer letter dated March 2, 1981 shows Alice Camp's dob as August 1907 Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL, compiled by Rayburn Blaylock says her dob is 27 Aug 1905, the 1910 Census of Monroe Co. enumerated in Apr 1910, backs the Aug 1907 date. gma

More About ALICE CAMP:

Date born 2: 27 August 1905

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

More About LEVI NORTHINGTON:

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

4. M ARY E LLA (TWIN) 9 A KINS (ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 31 October 1882 in Lamar Co., AL, and died 23 February 1973 in Gilmory Hospital, Armory, MS. She married T HOMAS B ENTON C AMP 18 September 1901 in Lamar Co., AL, son of ? C AMP and L OUVINA ? . He was born 14 February 1880 in MS, and died 29 December 1965 in 9:30 a,m., at home, MS.

Notes for M ARY E LLA (TWIN) A KINS :

Mary Ella and Nancy Della are twins. They also married brothers Thomas Benton and Charlie B. Camp.

1900 US Census, Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 46, sheet 1, house #2, line 4, enumerated by W.C. Evans.

Akin, Jane L. head Oct 1849 51 WD pb AL fapb MS mopb AL Farmer

James W. son Jun 1880 20 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Della N. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

>>>Ella M. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Emily C. dau Jul 1887 13 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Henry B. son Apr 1889 11 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Rody J. dau May 1892 9 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

1910 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 57, family 57, line 54

Camp, Thomas B. Hd M W 30 yrs md 9 yrs MS MS AL Farmer

>>>Mary E. wf F W 29 yrs md 9 yrs AL US MS

Lulla A. dau F W 8 yrs s AL MS AL

Fleeta J. dau F W 5 yrs s AL MS AL

James son M W 2 yrs s AL MS AL

Louvina Mo F W 63 yrs wd AL SC SC

Mary has had 3 children and 3 children are still living

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 4b, Bk 1, p. 107b, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Camp, Thomas head m w 50yrs md at 21yrs MS MS AL gen farming

Mary E. wife f w 48yrs md at 19yrs AL MS MS

Jimmie son m w 21yrs s MS MS MS farm laborer

Henry son m w 17yrs s MS MS MS

Louvenina mo f w 86yrs wd 16yrs AL AL SC

Pickle, Joel C. s/law m w 29yrs md at 19yrs MS MS MS sawmill laborer

Lula dau f w 27yrs md at 17yrs AL MS MS

Luciel g/dau f w 8yrs s MS MS AL

It shows that Louvenina was married when she was 16yrs old.

More About M ARY E LLA (TWIN) A KINS :

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

Notes for T HOMAS B ENTON C AMP :

1870 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Smithville PO, pg. 38, dwelling 257, family 284, enumerated 20 Jul 1870, Roll 741, bk 1

has a Thomas Camp aged 11 yrs living with his mother Lucy Camp aged 39 and sisters Ann 15yrs, Mary 14yrs, and a Pauline 2yrs old. I wonder if this is my Thomas Camp? gma 1870-39=1831

1900 US Census, Monro Co., MS, Pickle Vatney Prec., p. 58a, ED 70, enumerated on 1 Jun 1900, house 113

Camp, Charlie B. hd w m b. Apr 1866 aged 34 s AL AL AL farmer

Lovina mo w f b. Jan 1845 aged 55 wd AL SC SC

Thomas B. bro w f b. Feb 1880 aged 20 s MS AL AL farm laborer

Lavina has had 6 children of which 4 are still living.

1910 Census of Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 57, family 57, line 54

Camp, Thomas B. Hd M W 30 yrs md 9 yrs MS MS AL Farmer

Mary E. wf F W 29 yrs md 9 yrs AL US MS

Lulla A. dau F W 8 yrs s AL MS AL

Fleeta J. dau F W 5 yrs s AL MS AL

James son M W 2 yrs s AL MS AL

Louvina Mo F W 63 yrs wd AL SC SC

Mary has had 3 children and 3 children are still living

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 4b, Bk 1, p. 107b, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Camp, Thomas head m w 50yrs md at 21yrs MS MS AL gen farming

Mary E. wife f w 48yrs md at 19yrs AL MS MS

Jimmie son m w 21yrs s MS MS MS farm laborer

Henry son m w 17yrs s MS MS MS

Louvenina mo f w 86yrs wd 16yrs AL AL SC

Pickle, Joel C. s/law m w 29yrs md at 19yrs MS MS MS sawmill laborer

Lula dau f w 27yrs md at 17yrs AL MS MS

Luciel g/dau f w 8yrs s MS MS AL

It shows that Louvenina was married when she was 16yrs old.

More About T HOMAS B ENTON C AMP :

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery Lamar Co., AL

Children of M ARY A KINS and T HOMAS C AMP are:

11. i. LULA ARIZENE10 CAMP, b. 25 July 1902, Lamar Co., AL d. Unknown, Living in Amory, MS, May 1981.

ii. FLETA JANE CAMP, b. 26 April 1906, Monroe Co., MS d. Unknown, Living in Greenwood Springs, MS, 75 yr old, in May 1981 m. EDD NOEL PALMER, 21 December 1929, Smithville, Monroe Co., MS b. 31 January 1908, Monroe Co., MS d. 30 May 1974.

Notes for FLETA JANE CAMP:

1910 Census of Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 57, family 57, line 54

Camp, Thomas B. Hd M W 30 yrs md 9 yrs MS MS AL Farmer

Mary E. wf F W 29 yrs md 9 yrs AL US MS

Lulla A. dau F W 8 yrs s AL MS AL

Fleeta J. dau F W 5 yrs s AL MS AL

James son M W 2 yrs s AL MS AL

Louvina Mo F W 63 yrs wd AL SC SC

Mary has had 3 children and 3 children are still living

Fleta made calls and gathered a lot of information on the children of John and Jane Blaylock Akins. I didn't have the full names of any of their children. She got the full names and the dates for me. Geo Akins

More About FLETA JANE CAMP:

Burial: Unknown, Pickle Cemetery, Monroe Co., MS

More About EDD NOEL PALMER:

Burial: Unknown, Pickle Cemetery, Monroe Co., MS

iii. JIMMIE CAMP, b. 12 August 1909, Monroe Co., MS d. Unknown, still living Mar 1981 m. LOUIS LEECH, Monroe Co., MS b. 25 September 1913, Monroe Co., MS d. Unknown, still living Mar 1981.

Notes for JIMMIE CAMP:

1910 Census of Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 57, family 57, line 54

Camp, Thomas B. Hd M W 30 yrs md 9 yrs MS MS AL Farmer

Mary E. wf F W 29 yrs md 9 yrs AL US MS

Lulla A. dau F W 8 yrs s AL MS AL

Fleeta J. dau F W 5 yrs s AL MS AL

James son M W 2 yrs s AL MS AL

Louvina Mo F W 63 yrs wd AL SC SC

Mary has had 3 children and 3 children are still living

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 4b, Bk 1, p. 107b, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Camp, Thomas head m w 50yrs md at 21yrs MS MS AL gen farming

Mary E. wife f w 48yrs md at 19yrs AL MS MS

Jimmie son m w 21yrs s MS MS MS farm laborer

Henry son m w 17yrs s MS MS MS

Louvenina mo f w 86yrs wd 16yrs AL AL SC

Pickle, Joel C. s/law m w 29yrs md at 19yrs MS MS MS sawmill laborer

Lula dau f w 27yrs md at 17yrs AL MS MS

Luciel g/dau f w 8yrs s MS MS AL

It shows that Louvenina was married when she was 16yrs old.

iv. HENRY FRANKLIN CAMP, b. 26 March 1913, Monroe Co., MS d. 24 June 1992 m. EDITH COLE, 25 April 1936, Monroe Co., MS b. 30 May 1915, Lamar Co., AL d. 11 December 1969, Monroe Co., MS.

Notes for HENRY FRANKLIN CAMP:

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 4b, Bk 1, p. 107b, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Camp, Thomas head m w 50yrs md at 21yrs MS MS AL gen farming

Mary E. wife f w 48yrs md at 19yrs AL MS MS

Jimmie son m w 21yrs s MS MS MS farm laborer

Henry son m w 17yrs s MS MS MS

Louvenina mo f w 86yrs wd 16yrs AL AL SC

Pickle, Joel C. s/law m w 29yrs md at 19yrs MS MS MS sawmill laborer

Lula dau f w 27yrs md at 17yrs AL MS MS

Luciel g/dau f w 8yrs s MS MS AL

It shows that Louvenina was married when she was 16yrs old.

More About HENRY FRANKLIN CAMP:

Burial: Unknown, Pickle Cemetery, Monroe Co., MS

5. E MILY C . 9 A KINS (ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 12 April 1886 in AL, and died 05 August 1959. She married W ILLIAM Z OTOSH " B ILL" I RVIN 03 November 1903. He was born 23 September 1882, and died 20 February 1962.

Notes for E MILY C . A KINS :

1900 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 46, sheet 1, house #2, line 4, enumerated by W.C. Evans.

Akin, Jane L. head Oct 1849 51 WD pb AL fapb MS mopb AL Farmer

James W. son Jun 1880 20 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Della N. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Ella M. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

>>Emily C. dau Jul 1887 13 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Henry B. son Apr 1889 11 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Rody J. dau May 1892 9 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

1910 Census of Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 54, family 54, line 41

Irvin, Wiliam Z. Hd M W 27 yrs md 8 yrs MS MS MS Farmer

>>Emly C. wf F W 22 yrs md 8 yrs AL AL MS

Gurney A. son M W 6 yrs s MS MS AL

Burney L. dau F W 2 yrs s MS MS AL

Emly has had 2 children and both are still living.

Emily told my mother that grandpa Ben Henry Akins lived with her after his mother died. She could not get him to go to school. She would send him but he wouldn't make it.

More About E MILY C . A KINS :

Places lived: Smithsville, Monroe Co., MS

Notes for W ILLIAM Z OTOSH " B ILL" I RVIN :

1910 Census of Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 54, family 54, line 41

Irvin, William Z. Hd M W 27 yrs md 8 yrs MS MS MS Farmer

Emly C. wf F W 22 yrs md 8 yrs AL AL MS

Gurney A. son M W 6 yrs s MS MS AL

Burney L. dau F W 2 yrs s MS MS AL

Emly has had 2 children and both are still living.

Children of E MILY A KINS and W ILLIAM I RVIN are:

i. GURNEY A.10 IRVIN, b. 14 September 1904, AL d. Unknown, still living Mar 1981 m. CLIFFORD BRASSFIELD d. Unknown, still living Mar 1981.

Notes for GURNEY A. IRVIN:

1910 Census of Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 54, family 54, line 41

Irvin, Wiliam Z. Hd M W 27 yrs md 8 yrs MS MS MS Farmer

Emly C. wf F W 22 yrs md 8 yrs AL AL MS

Gurney A. son M W 6 yrs s MS MS AL

Burney L. dau F W 2 yrs s MS MS AL

Emly has had 2 children and both are still living.

Born on the MS and AL state line.

ii. BURNEY L. IRVIN, b. 17 October 1907, AL d. Unknown, still living Mar 1981 m. CHAP FAULKNER, 08 April 1928, Monroe Co., MS b. 25 June 1902 d. 25 November 1978.

Notes for BURNEY L. IRVIN:

1910 Census of Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 54, family 54, line 41

Irvin, Wiliam Z. Hd M W 27 yrs md 8 yrs MS MS MS Farmer

Emly C. wf F W 22 yrs md 8 yrs AL AL MS

Gurney A. son M W 6 yrs s MS MS AL

Burney L. dau F W 2 yrs s MS MS AL

Emly has had 2 children and both are still living.

Born on the MS AL state line.

6. BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9 A KINS (ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 14 August 1888 in Sulligent, Lamar Co., AL, and died 10 March 1958 in VA Hosp. Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR. He married LILLIAN A REBELLA M AY 12 March 1919 in Benton, Saline Co., AR, daughter of BENJAMIN M AY and MATTIE M C G ARRH . She was born 14 September 1903 in Webster Co., MS, and died 12 December 1963 in Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.

Notes for BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" A KINS :

Jones Co. was formed 4 Feb 1867 from Marion, Fayette and Pickens Co's. It was abolished 3 Nov 1867 and returned to its parent counties. Sanford Co. was organized 8 Oct 1868 from the territory originally set apart to Jones Co., and was changed to Lamar Co., In 1877

1900 US Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 46, sheet 1, house #2, line 4, enumerated by W.C. Evans.

Akin, Jane L. head Oct 1849 51 WD pb AL fapb MS mopb AL Farmer

James W. son Jun 1880 20 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Della N. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Ella M. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Emily C. dau Jul 1887 13 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

>>Henry B.<< son Apr 1889 11 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Rody J. dau May 1892 9 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

1920 US Census of Saline Co., AR, Bauxite Township, was enumerated 6 Jan 1920: ED 181, Sheet # 4 B.

Shaw Road, Dwelling 71, family 73

Akins, Benjamin<< head 30 male pb AL fapb AL mopb AL WaterBoy Bauxite Minng

Elizabeth wife 16 female pb MS fapb MS mopb MS

He couldn't read or write, she could. They are enumerated right next door to her parents, Benjamin and Mattie Lona (McGarrh) May. gma

1930 Census of Pulaski Co., AR, Big Rock Twp., 4017 21St., Little Rock, ED 37, Sh 20a, family 460, Vol 57, Enumerated on 12 Apr 1930

Akins, B. Henry<< head 30 md at 20 AR AR AR

Lilly Belle wife 25 md at 15 AR AR AR

Charles son 1 0/12 AR AR AR

I wonder who the informant was to the enumerator, Ben and Lilly were not born in AR nor were their parents, and Ben was 29 in 1919 when they married, and 30 a yr later in 1920 census. He should be 40 in this census.

Arkansas State Board of Health, Vital Statistics, Certificate of Death

Place of death: DOA New Veterans Hospital, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

Usual Residence: 1311 West 28th Street, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.

Date of Death: 10 Mar 1958 Age at death: 69 years, 6 months, and 26 days

Date of Birth: 14 Aug 1888 Birthplace: Sulligant, Alabama

Usual Occupation: retired lineman from AP&L

Fatheres Name: Jim Akins Mothers Name: Mary Blaylock.

Informant: Mrs. Lillie B. Akins, Little Rock, AR

Cause of Death: Coronary Occlusion Consequence of . arteriosclerosis

Interval between onset and death: 5 minutes

Burial: Bauxite Cemetery, Bauxite, AR

I believe that Lillie Belle may have forgotten his parents names. I feel that his AP&L application filled out in 1932 to be his correct parents names and I confirmed the names finding them in the 1880 Census. Geo Akins

Obituary of Benjamin Henry "Ben" Akins, Arkansas Democrat, Tuesday March 11, 1958:

Ben Henry Akins, 69, 1311 W. 28th, an Arkansas Power & Light Co. lineman for 30 years until he retired five years ago, died yesterday in a Little Rock hospital. He was a member of the Harvey Hicks Memorial Baptist Church, and the Arkansas Power and Light Co. 25-year Club. Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Lillie Belle May Akins three sons, John T. Akins, U.S. Navy in Norfolk, Va., Robert

B. Akins, North Little Rock, Charles W. Akins, U.S. Air Force in Japan a daughter, Mrs. Henrie Mae McGraw, North Little Rock three sisters, Mrs. Emily Irvin, Smithville, Miss., Mrs. Della Camp and Mrs. Ella Camp, both of Greenwood Springs, Miss., and 11 grandchildren.

Funeral arrangements will be announced by Griffin-Leggett.

Un-named or dated newspaper obituary of Benjamin Henry "Ben" Akins (14 August 1888-10 March 1958)

Ben Henry Akins, Retired Lineman

Ben Henry Akins, aged 69, of 1311 West Twenty-eight Street, an Arkansas Power &

Light Company lineman for 30 years until he retired five years ago, died Monday at a

Little Rock hospital. He was a member of the Harvey Hicks Memorial Baptist Church, and

the Arkansas Power and Light Company 25-year Club. Survivors include his wife, Mrs.

Lillie Belle May Akins three sons, John T. Akins with the Navy at Norfolk, Va., Robert

B. Akins of North Little Rock and Charles W. Akins with the Air Force in Japan a

daughter, Mrs. Henrie Mae McGraw of North Little Rock, and three sisters, Mrs. Emily

Irvin of Irvin of Smithville, Miss., Mrs. Della Camp and Mrs. Ella Camp, both of

Greenwood Springs, Miss., and 11 grandchildren. Funeral arrangements will be

announced by Griffin-Leggett.

Ben died at 69 years of age.

He lived at 1311 W. 28th St., Little Rock, AR until his death.

Ben and Lillie Belle purchased their home (Legal description: North one hundred thirty (130) feet of lot eight (8) block twenty-four (24) Braddock's Boulevard Addition to Little Rock, Arkansas) on 10 Feb 1943, for $2,250.00. Paid $500.00 down and $25.00 a month at 6%, until it was paid for. I have the original Agreement of Purchase and Sale. It was hand written with pencil. They were living at 2620 Bishop St. at this time.

Monthly installment note was to Walthour-Flake Co., Inc. The original has both Ben's mark and Lillie Belle's signature.

He worked for Ark Power & Light Co., a lineman for 30 years.

He retired from AP&L five years before his death.

He worked at American Bauxite Co., the 4 years prior to AP&L.

Information taken from the VA Records:

Army Service - 27 May 1918 to 18 Jan 1919

5 Jul 1917 The Saline Co. Benton Courier published a list of Saline Co. Young men that was eligible for WWI Draft. He was on the list.

WWI First List of Men that were Subject to Draft July 5, 1917

27 May 1918 to 18 Jan 1919 He was stationed at Camp Pike, now called

Camp Robinson, during WW1. He was packed and ready for shipment just as the war ended.

1932, on 15 Feb He went to work in construction, Pine Bluff, Trans. maint clearing crew.

1939, US City Directory, LR, AR, Ben H. (Lillie B.) Akins, lab., h. 611 Ferry St, LR, AR

1940, US City Directory, LR, AR, Ben H. (Lillie B.) Akins, wireman., h. 611 Ferry St, LR, AR

AP&L Newsletter Interview with Ben Akins about the time of his retirement:

Ground man B.H. Akins Recalls AP&L Was Better Than Levee Job

Ground man Ben Henry Akins recalls he had been working for the Company a few

years when he decided he had rather work for another outfit.

"I took a job helping construct a levee below West Memphis," he commented, "but it

did not take long to decide that if AP&L would take me back I would stay with them."

The Company did take him back and he stayed. Last July 1 he completed his 30th year

with Arkansas Power & Light.

While working in the mines at Bauxite Ben learned that AP&L needed a man with a

team of horses. Ben applied for the job and before long was hauling poles with his teams.

One of his first jobs was on the transmission line from Remmel Dam to Pine Bluff. He

worked for the construction crews for many years and for the past 12 years his work is

mostly construction substations around the fast growing AP&L property.

"Back in the early days we moved around the state a lot," he remembers.

"We moved from job to job and we have lived at Bauxite, Fordyce, Monticello, Hamburg,

Camden, Smackover, Pine Bluff and many other towns."

Before the children got large enough to go to school the family enjoyed moving

around from place to place to place. "We had a tent," Ben explained, " and when no

house was available, we just put up the tent and lived in it."

For the past 20 years his home has been in Little Rock. He now lives at 1311 West

28th Street. His hobby is gardening and he has room for a garden and orchard. He also

Mrs. Akins is the former Lillie Bell May of Bauxite. Her folks kept the boarding house

where Mr. Akins boarded while working there. That is how they first met. They were

There are three boys and a girl in the family. Mrs. Henrie Mae McGraw, the daughter,

lives in Little Rock. Son Bobby works for AP&L at the Lynch Plant. The other two boys,

John Thomas and Charles, are serving in the Navy. There are five grandchildren, all boys.

A native of Sulligent, Alabama, Ground man Akins served in the Army for 11 months

He is rightfully proud of his record of never having been injured while on the job for

AP&L during his 30 years service.

When Mr. Akins joined the company years ago there was some mistake about how his

name was spelled. It got on the AP&L records as "Aikens: and is often still spelled that

way. the correct spelling is "Akins." "my pay checks usually are spelled 'Aikens' but I

don't mind," he remarked, "just as long as I can cash the checks."

Newspaper article, no date, no name

Veteran APL Construction Man Retires

Ben Henry Akins, 65 year old construction worker with Arkansas Power & Light Co., is being retired from the company after 30 years of service putting up power lines throughout Arkansas.

Mr. Akins, who lives at 1311 W. 28th with his wife, the former Miss Lillie Belle May, Bauxite, received a gold watch and pen from company officials.

On construction crews in early years, Mr. Akins remembers living in tents in rural areas when lodgings were not available. He did work at Bauxite, Fordyce, Monticello, Hamburg, Camden, Pine Bluff and Rison.

Now that he is retiring Mr. Akins plans to raise chickens and plant a garden. He has four children: Charles and John, both in the Navy Robert, an employee of AP&L and Mrs. G. F. McGraw, No. Little Rock.

Called AP&L for information in their personnel files on Ben Henry

This is the information in their file:

His Social Security # 431-09-3264, the 431 signifies that he got it in AR.

Went to work at AP&L 15 Feb 1932 in Pine Bluff.

Father was John Akins - Spelled Aikens, he couldn't read, the form was filled out by someone else.

Mother was Jane Blalock - spelled with a y, Blaylock.

Worked at American Bauxite Co. Prior to AP&L.

He served 1 year in the Army.

He had six years of Grammer School.

Lived in Baldknob when laid off at AP&L.

Names of References given on application were:

Sheriff in Benton - Z.A. Rooker

A farmer named Jim W. Keyhill end of call.

Dr. E.A. Buckly came to Bauxite in 1919 and built up a large practice and was the physician for the Bauxite Manufacturing Co.

The information taken off the US ARMY Grave marker at the Bauxite Cemetery reads:

Aug 14, 1888 March 10, 1958

I Found this cemetery information in Saline County Cemeteries - Barber Section III, Ark

929.376722 Bauxite Cemetery, Range 14W - Township 2S, Section 16.

July 28, 1922 - February 12, 1923

September 14, 1903 - December 12, 1963

Information was Catalogued by: Dorris and Bernard Barber, July 6, 1986

Directions: From Benton, Highway 183 or better known as the Bauxite Highway to the

road before the railroad underpass. Turn right and go south about 0.8 of a mile. The

cemetery is on the left. It is a well planned cemetery with a fence around it.

Historical information: The Bauxite Company set up the cemetery because Mr. J.F.

Gibbons' wife wanted to be buried at Bauxite and there was no cemetery there when she

died. The Bauxite Company kept it up for many years. It was incorporated in 1974. The

oldest marked grave is that of Janie Francis Gibbons, wife of J.F. Gibbons, April 3, 1919.

More About BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" A KINS :

Burial: Unknown, Bauxite Cemetery, Bauxite, Saline Co., AR

Church Affiliation: Member of Harvey Hicks Memorial Baptist Church

Medical Information: due to or as a consequence of . arteriosclerosis.

Military Record: 27 May 1918, Entered US ARMY, WWI. He served untill 18 Jan 1919.

Occupation: He was a Ark Power and Light Co., 25 year Club.

Places lived: Bauxite, Fordyce, Monticello, Hamburg, Camden, Smackover, Pine Bluff, LR all AR

Residence: 10 March 1958, 1311 W. 28th St., Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

Retirement: 1953, Arkansas Power & Light, after 30 yrs as a lineman

Notes for LILLIAN A REBELLA M AY :

1910 US Census, Webster Co., MS, ED 109, sheet 1B Dist #2, Dwelling 47, Family 47, Enumeration date 15 Apr 1910

May, Benjamin head 32 md male MS MS MS General Farmer reads & writes

Mattie wife 29 md female MS MS MS reads & writes

>>Lillian<< dau 6 s female MS MS MS reads & writes

Franklin son 4 s male MS MS MS

Pearl dau 2 s female MS MS MS

Paul son 3/12 male MS MS MS

They have been married for 7 years, Mattie has had 4 children and 4 still living.

Bens brother Leo and Mattie's sister Lizzie live right next door, dwelling 48, family 48

6 Jan 1920 - 1920 Census of Saline Co., AR, Bauxite Township, was enumerated: ED 181, Sheet # 4 B.

Shaw Road, Dwelling 71, family 73

Akins, Benjamin head 30 male pb AL fapb AL mopb AL WaterBoy Bauxite Minng

>>Elizabeth<< wife 16 female pb MS fapb MS mopb MS

They are enumerated right next door to her parents, Benjamin and Mattie Lona (McGarrh) May. gma

1930 Census of Pulaski Co., AR, Big Rock Twp., 4017 21St., Little Rock, ED 37, Sh 20a, family 460, Vol 57, Enumerated on 12 Apr 1930

Akins, B. Henry head 30 md at 20 AR AR AR

>>Lilly Belle<< wife 25 md at 15 AR AR AR

Charles son 1 0/12 AR AR AR

I wonder who the informant was to the enumerator, Ben and Lilly were not born in AR nor were their parents, and Ben was 29 in 1919 when they married, and 30 a yr later in 1920 census. He should be 40 in this census.

When Lillian's first child (Henrie Mae) was born August 21, 1920, she wasn't making enough milk so her mother, Big Ma, breast fed her. Big Ma's son, Lloyd was born May 28th of that year also. Aunt Mae told her daughter Lillie about this.

Arkansas State Board of Health, Vital Statistics, Certificate of Death #63-018493, Reg. Dist. 63,

Place of death: Arkansas Baptist Hospital, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

Usual Residence: 1311 West 28th St., Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

Died Thursday, 12 Dec 1963, at 59 yrs. 2 mos. 28 days She was Widowed

Born 14 Aug 1904, Stewart, MS. Usual Occupation: Housework

Father's name: Benjamin M. May Mother's name: Mattie McGarrah.

Informant: John T. Akins, Rt 1, Box 282, Jacksonville, AR

Cause of death: Coronary Occlusion Other significant condition: previous coronary occlusion

Interval between onset and death: 7 days

Burial: 14 Dec 1963 at Bauxite Cemetery, Bauxite, Arkansas

Funeral Home: Griffin Leggett, Little Rock, AR

Newspaper Obituary - Arkansas Democrat - Friday, December 13, 1963

Mrs. Lillie Bell May Akins, 59, 1311 W. 28th , widow of Ben H. Akins, died yesterday

in a Little Rock hospital. She was a member of Longview Baptist Church. Survivors

include three sons, John T. Akins and Robert B. Akins, both of North Little Rock, and

Charles W. Akins of the Little Rock Air Force Base a daughter, Mrs. G.F. McGraw of

North Little Rock her mother, Mrs. B.M. May of Little Rock three brothers , Paul B.

May of LaFayette, La., Robert H. May of North Little Rock and Lloyd W. May of

Houston a sister, Mrs. J.M. Fleetwood of Houston, and 12 grandchildren.

Funeral will be tomorrow at 2 p.m. in the Long View Baptist Church by rev. Charles

Lawrence. Burial will be in Bauxite Cemetery.

Pallbearers will be Harry Henson, Earnie W. McKissack, Von C. Lewis, Lewis Deere,

More About LILLIAN A REBELLA M AY :

Burial: 14 December 1963, Bauxite Cemetery, Bauxite, Saline Co., AR

Cause of Death: Coronary Occlusion, interval between onset and death, 7 days.

Church Affiliation: Member of Longview Baptist Church.

Medical Information: Other significant condition was previous coronary Occlusion. Interval between onset and death was 7 Days.

Places lived: Webster Co., MS, Pulaski Co., AR

Residence: 11 March 1958, 1311 W. 28th St., Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

Social Security Number: 429-46-1823

Marriage Notes for BENJAMIN A KINS and LILLIAN M AY :

Ben and Lillie Bell met while Ben was living in the boarding house that her parents ran.

Ben was 29 years old and Lilliebelle was 15 years old when they got married.

More About BENJAMIN A KINS and LILLIAN M AY :

Marriage: 12 March 1919, Benton, Saline Co., AR

Children of BENJAMIN A KINS and LILLIAN M AY are:

12. i. HENRIE MAE10 AKINS, b. 21 August 1920, Bauxite, Saline Co., AR d. 06 July 1983, Baptist Med. Center, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.

ii. LLOYD ELONZIO ADRIAN AKINS, b. 12 February 1923, Bauxite, Saline Co., AR d. 12 February 1923, Bauxite, Saline Co., AR.

More About LLOYD ELONZIO ADRIAN AKINS:

Burial: Unknown, Buried, Bauxite Cemetery, Bauxite, Saline Co., AR

13. iii. JOHN THOMAS "JACK" AKINS, SR., b. 05 February 1924, Bauxite, Bauxite Township, Saline Co., AR d. 04 October 1982, Doctors Hospital, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.

14. iv. ROBERT BUCKLEY "BOB" AKINS, b. 05 February 1926, Bauxite, Saline Co., AR d. 09 June 2000, Baptist Medical Center, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.

15. v. CHARLES WILLIAM "CHUCK" AKINS, b. 30 August 1928, Fordyce, Dallas Co., AR d. 24 August 1991, Jacksonville, Pulaski Co., AR.

7. R HODA J ANE 9 A KINS (ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 11 April 1891 in AL, and died Bef. April 1981. She married O SCAR T . L OWRY . He was born Abt. 1874 in MS, and died Bef. April 1981.

Notes for R HODA J ANE A KINS :

1900 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 46, sheet 1, house #2, line 4, enumerated by W.C. Evans.

Akin, Jane L. head Oct 1849 51 WD pb AL fapb MS mopb AL Farmer

James W. son Jun 1880 20 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Della N. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Ella M. dau Sep 1884 16 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Emily C. dau Jul 1887 13 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Henry B. son Apr 1889 11 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

Rody J. dau May 1892 9 pb AL fapb AL mopb AL

1920 Census, Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Prec., beat 2, ED 59, sh 5b, ln 57, enumerated on 20 & 21 Jan 1920 by E.C. Dreskell. Dwelling 10, family 12, on Spring & Detroit Road.

Lowry, Oscar T. Head w m aged 46yrs md MS US US laborer Sawmill

Rhoda wife w m aged 38yrs md AL AL AL

Birdie dau w f aged 9yrs s MS AL MS

Geneva dau w f aged 5yrs s MS AL MS

J. T. son w m aged 1 3/12 s MS AL MS

The places of birth are transcribed just as the enumerator wrote, but the father and mother places of birth for the children are backwards, gma

Notes for O SCAR T . L OWRY :

1920 Census, Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Prec., beat 2, ED 59, sh 5b, ln 57, enumerated on 20 & 21 Jan 1920 by E.C. Dreskell. Dwelling 10, family 12, on Spring & Detroit Road.

Lowry, Oscar T. Head w m aged 46yrs md MS US US laborer Sawmill

Rhoda wife w m aged 38yrs md AL AL AL

Birdie dau w f aged 9yrs s MS AL MS

Geneva dau w f aged 5yrs s MS AL MS

J. T. son w m aged 1 3/12 s MS AL MS

The places of birth are transcribed just as the enumerator wrote, but the father and mother places of birth for the children are backwards, gma

Marriage Notes for R HODA A KINS and O SCAR L OWRY :

The letter I have from Fleta Jane (Camp) Palmer, says that Rhoda and Askers first two children, Birtie & J.T., married each other. I don't know if this is possible. Geo Akins

Children of R HODA A KINS and O SCAR L OWRY are:

i. BIRTIE10 LOWRY, b. Abt. 1911, MS d. Deceased.

Notes for BIRTIE LOWRY:

===================================

1920 Census, Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Prec., beat 2, ED 59, sh 5b, ln 57, enumerated on 20 & 21 Jan 1920 by E.C. Dreskell. Dwelling 10, family 12, on Spring & Detroit Road.

per fa mo

Lowry, Oscar T. Head w m aged 46yrs md MS US US laborer Sawmill

Rhoda wife w m aged 38yrs md AL AL AL

Birdie dau w f aged 9yrs s MS AL MS

Geneva dau w f aged 5yrs s MS AL MS

J. T. son w m aged 1 3/12 s MS AL MS

The places of birth are transcribed just as the enumerator wrote, but the father and mother places of birth for the children are backwards, gma

ii. GENEVA LOWRY, b. Abt. 1915, MS d. Unknown, still living Mar 1981 m. ROBERT COFFEE d. Unknown, still living Mar 1981.

Notes for GENEVA LOWRY:

===================================

1920 Census, Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Prec., beat 2, ED 59, sh 5b, ln 57, enumerated on 20 & 21 Jan 1920 by E.C. Dreskell. Dwelling 10, family 12, on Spring & Detroit Road.

per fa mo

Lowry, Oscar T. Head w m aged 46yrs md MS US US laborer Sawmill

Rhoda wife w m aged 38yrs md AL AL AL

Birdie dau w f aged 9yrs s MS AL MS

Geneva dau w f aged 5yrs s MS AL MS

J. T. son w m aged 1 3/12 s MS AL MS

The places of birth are transcribed just as the enumerator wrote, but the father and mother places of birth for the children are backwards, gma

iii. J.T. LOWRY, b. Abt. October 1919, MS d. Deceased.

Notes for J.T. LOWRY:

===================================

1920 Census, Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Prec., beat 2, ED 59, sh 5b, ln 57, enumerated on 20 & 21 Jan 1920 by E.C. Dreskell. Dwelling 10, family 12, on Spring & Detroit Road.

per fa mo

Lowry, Oscar T. Head w m aged 46yrs md MS US US laborer Sawmill

Rhoda wife w m aged 38yrs md AL AL AL

Birdie dau w f aged 9yrs s MS AL MS

Geneva dau w f aged 5yrs s MS AL MS

J. T. son w m aged 1 3/12 s MS AL MS

The places of birth are transcribed just as the enumerator wrote, but the father and mother places of birth for the children are backwards, gma

8. J AMES W ESLEY " W ESS" 10 R AY (B ETTIE M ALINDA 9 A KINS , ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 17 May 1896 in AL, and died 13 July 1980. He married L ULA R . M YRTIS " M IRT" P ICKLE 04 February 1917, daughter of J ACOB P ICKLE and S USAN B LALOCK . She was born 28 August 1897 in MS, and died 26 August 1995.

Notes for J AMES W ESLEY " W ESS" R AY :

1910 US Census, Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 60, p. 53B, enumerated 15 Apr 1910, Roll 20, Bk 3, family 13

Ray, Monroe Hd M W 36yrs md 14yrs MS AL MS Saw Mill

Bettie wife F W 32yrs md 14yrs AL AL MS

>>Wesley son M W 12yrs s AL MS AL

Willie son M W 10yrs s AL MS AL

Geans? son M W 7yrs s AL MS AL

Sarah dau F W 5yrs s AL MS AL

Ida dau F W 4yrs s AL MS AL

Roy son M W 2yrs s AL MS AL

Qunie dau F W 8/12yrs s AL MS AL b. abt Oct 1909

This Census shows that Betty has had 7 children, and that all 7 are still living.

1920 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Prec., ED 59, sh 7a, enumerated 22nd & 27th January 1920 by E.C. Dreskell, ln 3, dwelling 41, family 43

Ray, J. Wesley head w m aged 22yrs md AL AL AL Farmer abt 1898

Myrtice wife w f aged 24yrs md MS MS MS abt 1896

Christine dau w f aged 3/12 s MS AL MS abt Oct 1919

Pickle, Susan E. mo-n-law w f aged 64 wd MS US US abt 1856

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (north part) ED 48-9, st 4b roll #1159, bk 1, p. 107b., line 85, dwelling 78, family 78

Ray, John W. head w m aged 29yrs md at 21yrs AL MS AL Farmer

Myrtice wife w f aged 35yrs md at 33yrs MS MS MS

Christine dau w f aged 3/12 s MS AL MS

Kenneth son w m aged 5yrs s MS AL MS

Pickle, Susie mo-n-law w f aged 75 wd AL AL MS

Susie is shown as being married at age of 25 and widowed

Notes for L ULA R . M YRTIS " M IRT" P ICKLE :

1920 Census, Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Prec., ED 59, sh 7a, enumerated 22nd & 27th January 1920 by E.C. Dreskell, ln 3, dwelling 41, family 43

Ray, J. Wesley head w m aged 22yrs md AL AL AL Farmer abt 1898

Myrtice wife w f aged 24yrs md MS MS MS abt 1896

Christine dau w f aged 3/12 s MS AL MS abt Oct 1919

Pickle, Susan E. mo-n-law w f aged 64 wd MS US US abt 1856

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (north part) ED 48-9, st 4b roll #1159, bk 1, p. 107b., line 85, dwelling 78, family 78

Ray, John W. head w m aged 29yrs md at 21yrs AL MS AL Farmer

Myrtice wife w f aged 35yrs md at 33yrs MS MS MS

Christine dau w f aged 3/12 s MS AL MS

Kenneth son w m aged 5yrs s MS AL MS

Pickle, Susie mo-n-law w f aged 75 wd AL AL MS

Susie is shown as being married at age of 25 and widowed

I met her at the Family Reunion, Mothers Day, May 1981, she was 84 years old. gma

More About L ULA R . M YRTIS " M IRT" P ICKLE :

Census: 08 April 1930, 1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (north part) ED 48-9, st 4b roll #1159, bk 1, p. 107b., line 85, dwelling 78, family 78

More About J AMES R AY and L ULA P ICKLE :

Marriage: 04 February 1917

Children of J AMES R AY and L ULA P ICKLE are:

i. CHRISTINE11 RAY, b. Private.

ii. KENNETH RAY, b. Private.

9. S ARAH J ANE 10 R AY (B ETTIE M ALINDA 9 A KINS , ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 02 September 1907 in AL, and died 02 February 1986. She married J ACK J . N ORTHINGTON , son of R ICHARD N ORTHINGTON . He was born 10 October 1897, and died 27 December 1969.

Notes for S ARAH J ANE R AY :

Mirt (Pickle) Ray, oral interview, May 1981, Family reunion at Blalock Cem., MS said that Sarah Jane Ray Northington dob was 02 September 1907 Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL, compiled by Rayburn Blaylock says her dob is 2 Sep 1902

1910 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 60, p. 53B, enumerated 15 Apr 1910, Roll 20, Bk 3, family 13

Ray, Monroe Hd M W 36yrs md 14yrs MS AL MS Saw Mill

Bettie wife F W 32yrs md 14yrs AL AL MS

Wesley son M W 12yrs s AL MS AL

Willie son M W 10yrs s AL MS AL

Geans? son M W 7yrs s AL MS AL

>>Sarah<< dau F W 5yrs s AL MS AL

Ida dau F W 4yrs s AL MS AL

Roy son M W 2yrs s AL MS AL

Qunie dau F W 8/12yrs s AL MS AL b. abt Oct 1909

This Census shows that Betty has had 7 children, and that all 7 are still living.

1920 US Census, Monroe Co., Pickle Prec., ED 59, sh 7a, enumerated on 22nd & 27th of Jan 1920, by E.C. Dreskell, ln, 31, dwelling 48, family 50

Ray, Willie D. head w m aged 19yrs md MS MS AL laborer public works abt 1901

Margie A. wife w f aged 17yrs md MS MS MS abt 1903

Ray, J. Monroe head w m aged 48yrs md MS GA MS farmer abt 1872

Bettie wife w f aged 42yrs md AL AL AL abt 1876

Sarah dau w f aged 15yrs s MS MS AL abt 1905

Ida Bell dau w f aged 13yrs s MS MS AL abt 1907

Roy son w s aged 9yrs s MS MS AL abt 1911

Lillian dau w f aged 7yrs s MS MS AL abt 1913

More About S ARAH J ANE R AY :

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

Notes for J ACK J . N ORTHINGTON :

Mirt (Pickle) Ray, oral interview, May 1981, Family reunion at Blalock Cem., MS told me that Jack Northington's dob was 10 October 1897 Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL, compiled by Rayburn Blaylock says his dob is 10 Oct 1891

More About J ACK J . N ORTHINGTON :

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

Child of S ARAH R AY and J ACK N ORTHINGTON is:

i. FLOYD C.11 NORTHINGTON, b. Private.

10. R OY R EETH 10 R AY (B ETTIE M ALINDA 9 A KINS , ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 02 September 1907 in Monroe Co., MS, and died 08 August 1954. He married A FTON O ' C LAY H ILL . She was born 16 April 1915, and died 1986.

Notes for R OY R EETH R AY :

1910 Census of Lamar Co., AL, Pine Springs Beat, Pct 8, ED 60, p. 53B, enumerated 15 Apr 1910, Roll 20, Bk 3, family 13

Ray, Monroe Hd M W 36yrs md 14yrs MS AL MS Saw Mill

Bettie wife F W 32yrs md 14yrs AL AL MS

Wesley son M W 12yrs s AL MS AL

Willie son M W 10yrs s AL MS AL

Geans? son M W 7yrs s AL MS AL

Sarah dau F W 5yrs s AL MS AL

Ida dau F W 4yrs s AL MS AL

>>Roy<< son M W 2yrs s AL MS AL

Qunie dau F W 8/12yrs s AL MS AL b. abt Oct 1909

This Census shows that Betty has had 7 children, and that all 7 are still living.

1920 US Census, Monroe Co., Pickle Prec., ED 59, sh 7a, enumerated on 22nd & 27th of Jan 1920, by E.C. Dreskell, ln, 31, dwelling 48, family 50

Ray, Willie D. head w m aged 19yrs md MS MS AL laborer public works abt 1901

Margie A. wife w f aged 17yrs md MS MS MS abt 1903

Ray, J. Monroe head w m aged 48yrs md MS GA MS farmer abt 1872

Bettie wife w f aged 42yrs md AL AL AL abt 1876

Sarah dau w f aged 15yrs s MS MS AL abt 1905

Ida Bell dau w f aged 13yrs s MS MS AL abt 1907

Roy son w s aged 9yrs s MS MS AL abt 1911

Lillian dau w f aged 7yrs s MS MS AL abt 1913

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 5a, Bk 1, p. 108a, ln 11, dwelling 84, family 84, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Ray, Monroe head m w aged 50yrs md at 21yrs MS MS MS farmer

Bettie wife f w aged 50yrs md at 17yrs AL AL AL

Roy son m w aged 19yrs s AL AL AL

Ervin, Lillian dau f w aged 17yrs md at 17yrs MS AL AL

More About R OY R EETH R AY :

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

More About A FTON O ' C LAY H ILL :

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

Child of R OY R AY and A FTON H ILL is:

i. INFANT11 RAY, d. Deceased.

More About INFANT RAY:

Burial: Unknown, Blalock Cemetery, Lamar Co., AL

11. L ULA A RIZENE 10 C AMP (M ARY E LLA (TWIN) 9 A KINS , ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 25 July 1902 in Lamar Co., AL, and died Unknown in Living in Amory, MS, May 1981. She married J OEL C LAUES P ICKLE 16 November 1919. He was born 17 September 1900 in Monroe Co., MS, and died 30 September 1970 in Monroe Co., MS.

Notes for L ULA A RIZENE C AMP :

1910 Census of Monroe Co., MS, Pickle Pct, p. 79, enumerated 20 & 21 Apr 1910, Roll 752, Bk 1, dwelling 57, family 57, line 54

Camp, Thomas B. Hd M W 30 yrs md 9 yrs MS MS AL Farmer

Mary E. wf F W 29 yrs md 9 yrs AL US MS

Lulla A. dau F W 8 yrs s AL MS AL

Fleeta J. dau F W 5 yrs s AL MS AL

James son M W 2 yrs s AL MS AL

Louvina Mo F W 63 yrs wd AL SC SC

Mary has had 3 children and 3 children are still living

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 4b, Bk 1, p. 107b, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Camp, Thomas head m w 50yrs md at 21yrs MS MS AL gen farming

Mary E. wife f w 48yrs md at 19yrs AL MS MS

Jimmie son m w 21yrs s MS MS MS farm laborer

Henry son m w 17yrs s MS MS MS

Louvenina mo f w 86yrs wd 16yrs AL AL SC

Pickle, Joel C. s/law m w 29yrs md at 19yrs MS MS MS sawmill laborer

Lula dau f w 27yrs md at 17yrs AL MS MS

Luciel g/dau f w 8yrs s MS MS AL

It shows that Louvenina was married when she was 16yrs old.

Lula was almost blind, Mothers Day, May 1981. She had been staying some with her daughter in Oxford, MS and some hospital stay in Oxford.

More About L ULA A RIZENE C AMP :

Census: 08 April 1930, 1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 4b, Bk 1, p. 107b, was enumerated by Wm. M. Durrett

Residence: May 1981, Amory, MS

Notes for J OEL C LAUES P ICKLE :

1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 4b, Bk 1, p. 107b, enumerated 8 Apr 1930 by Wm. M. Durrett

Camp, Thomas head m w 50yrs md at 21yrs MS MS AL gen farming

Mary E. wife f w 48yrs md at 19yrs AL MS MS

Jimmie son m w 21yrs s MS MS MS farm laborer

Henry son m w 17yrs s MS MS MS

Louvenina mo f w 86yrs wd 16yrs AL AL SC

Pickle, Joel C. s/law m w 29yrs md at 19yrs MS MS MS sawmill laborer

Lula dau f w 27yrs md at 17yrs AL MS MS

Luciel g/dau f w 8yrs s MS MS AL

It shows that Louvenina was married when she was 16yrs old.

More About J OEL C LAUES P ICKLE :

Census: 08 April 1930, 1930 US Census, Monroe Co., MS, Beat 2 (North Part) ED 48-9, Sh 4b, Bk 1, p. 107b, was enumerated by Wm. M. Durrett

Fact 12: State of issue: MS

Fact 13: Social Security #: 425-20-5252

Places lived: Greenville, MS

More About J OEL P ICKLE and L ULA C AMP :

Marriage: 16 November 1919

Child of L ULA C AMP and J OEL P ICKLE is:

12. H ENRIE M AE 10 A KINS (BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 21 August 1920 in Bauxite, Saline Co., AR, and died 06 July 1983 in Baptist Med. Center, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR. She married G EORGE F RED M C G RAW 17 April 1940 in Benton, Saline Co., AR, son of A RTHUR M C G RAW and J ESSE J ENKINS . He was born 18 January 1920 in England, Lonoke Co., AR, and died 03 June 1971 in VA Hosp., Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.

Notes for H ENRIE M AE A KINS :

State of Arkansas, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Registration District # 6707, Page 3592

Place of Birth: Saline Co, Bauxite Township

Full Name of Child: Henrie Mae Akins Date of birth: August 21, 1920, 7:29 p.m.

Father: Ben Henry Akins Mother: Lillie Belle May

Fathers age: 31 Mothers age: 17

Place of Birth: Mississippi Place of Birth: Mississippi

Occupation: Mining Occupation: Housekeeping

Children born this Mother: 1

Dr. F.P. Vines signed and E.A. Buckley filed

1930 Census of Pulaski Co., AR, Big Rock Twp., 4017 21St., Little Rock, ED 37, Sh 20a, family 460, Vol 57, Enumerated on 12 Apr 1930

Akins, B. Henry head 30 md at 20 AR AR AR

Lilly Belle wife 25 md at 15 AR AR AR

Charles son 1 0/12 AR AR AR

Little Rock High School TIGER Graduating Classes January, May, July 1939

Be sure to check all sections for names. In the book most names have the persons place of birth and birth date, and which Junior High School they entered from.

Unless designated, almost all have photos of each student.

The Largest Group Ever To Graduate From LRHS

CANDIDATES FOR GRADUATION IN MAY 1939

1940, US City Directory, LR, AR, Henri M. Akins, mach opr BGM Co., r. 611 Ferry St, LR, AR (with her parents)

Arkansas Department of Health, Division of Vital Records

Decedent: Henri Mae McGraw

Date of death: Wed., July 6, 1983, at 3:15 p.m., Aged: 62 years

Place of death: Inpat at Baptist Med Center, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

State of birth: Arkansas Surviving spouse: Widowed

Social Security No.: 430-12-1125 Occupation: Retd salesperson, J.C. Penney' Company

Residence: 409 E. 20th, North Little Rock, Pulaski Co., Arkansas

Father: Benjamin Henry Akins Mother: Lillian Belle May

Informant: Wayne McGraw, 1600 Bosley, Little Rock, AR 72207

Burial: July 8, 1983, Pinecrest Cemetery, Saline Co., AR

Funeral Home: Griffin Legget Healey & Roth, 5800 W. 12th, Little Rock, AR

Immediate Cause of death: Cardiac Arrest

As a consequence of: Systemic Acidosis

As a consequence of: Congestive Heart Failure/ ASHD Arteriosclerotic Heart Disease

Name of Certifier: Jim Charles Kizziar, M.D., 10001 Lile Dr., Little Rock, AR 72205

The Arkansas Democrat, Little Rock, AR, July 8, 1983

Entered into Eternal Rest, Wednesday, July 6, 1983

Mrs. Henrie Mae McGraw, 62, of 409 E. 20th St., North Little Rock, a retired employee of J.C. Penney Co., Inc., widow of George Fred McGraw, died Wednesday. Mrs. McGraw was a member of Baring Cross Baptist Church and the Order of Eastern Star Chapter 362. Survivors are two sons, Wayne McGraw of Little Rock and Larry McGraw of Atlanta, GA a daughter, Miss Lillie McGraw of Little Rock two brothers, Robert Akins of North Little Rock and Charles Akins of Jacksonville and three grandchildren. Funeral will be at 9:30 a.m. today at Griffin Leggett Healey and Roth by the Rev. Jerry S. Hogan. Burial will be in Pinecrest Memorial Park. Pallbearers will be Ronnie Akins, Danny Akins, Gregg Hope, Tommy Akins, Tommy Reagan and Shawn Akins. Memorials may be made to Baring Cross Baptist Church or the American Heart Association. The family will be at 409 E. 20th St.

Saline County Public Schools Pupil's Report Card for Collegeville School

This is a first grade report card for her. Her teachers name was Mrs. Mayme Dodd.

Her name is spelled 'Henrimae Aiken' on this report card.

BigMa signed it the 3 times, Mrs. M. May, and grandma signed it 3 times, Mrs. B.H. Akins.

Aunt Mae lived with Bigma some during the time that Ben and Lilly bell were living in tents and moving around a lot.

I wonder why Aunt Mae didn't correct the spelling of her name on the report card. She made all A's and B's in Reading, Spelling, writing and conduct. She didn't do as well in math. Geo Akins

14 May 1951, she was living at 1711 East 6th St., Little Rock, AR. Taken off letter Mae wrote.

More About H ENRIE M AE A KINS :

Burial: 08 July 1983, Buried, Pincrest Memorial Cemetery, Alexander, Saline Co., AR

Cause of Death: Cardiac Arrest due to Systemic Acidosis

Church Affiliation: Member of Baring Cross Baptist Church.

Fact 8: She was a member of the Order of Eastern Star Chapter 362

Fact 12: State of issue: AR

Medical Information: Congestive Heart Failure/Arterioslerotic Heart Disoso ?

Occupation: Bet. 1944 - 1972, Retired from JC Penny, downtown LR, AR

Residence 1: 409 East 20th Street, North Little Rock, AR

Residence 2: 06 October 1982, North Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

Social Security Number: 430-12-1125

Notes for G EORGE F RED M C G RAW :

State of Arkansas, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Registration District #390-3601, Reg.# 13908

Place of Birth: England, England Township, Lonoke Co., AR

Full Name of Child: George Fred McGraw Date of birth: 18 Jan 1920, 12:20 a.m.

Father: Arthur Carl McGraw Mother: Jessie Lou Jenkins

Residence at time of birth: England, AR Residence at time of birth: England, AR

Fathers age: 28 Mothers age: 26

Place of Birth: Murfreesboro, Pike Co., AR Place of Birth: Junction City, Union Co., AR

Occupation: Telegrapher Occupation: Housewife

Children born this Mother: 4 Still living: 4

This Delayed Certificate of Birth on George was recorded by his mother Mrs. Jessie Lou McGraw on21 May 1942. Jessie Lou was living at 2700 Bishop St., Little Rock, AR, when she did this Birth Certificate.

George F. McGraw, 409 East 20th St, NLR, AR 72114

Height: 5'-11" Weight 170 lbs. Brown Hair, Blue eyes

Newspaper obituary: Arkansas Gazette June 4, 1971

George F. McGraw, aged 51, of 409 East 20th St., North Little Rock, an employee of the Buckeye Cotton Oil Mill, died Thursday. He was a member of Baring Cross Baptist Church. Survivors are his wife, Mrs. Henri Mae McGraw two sons, George McGraw of Little Rock, and Larry McGraw of North Little Rock a daughter, Miss Lillie S. McGraw of North Little Rock his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. McGraw of Little Rock three brothers, Carl McGraw of El Paso, TX, Ralph McGraw of Memphis and Clifton McGraw of Little Rock, and two sisters, Mrs. Herman Powelke of Little Rock and Mrs. Virginia Campbell of Greenville, SC. Funeral arrangements will be announced by Griffin-Leggett.

Newspaper obituary: unknown paper

Funeral for George Fred McGraw, aged 51, of 409 East Twentieth Street, North Little Rock, who died Thursday, will be at 12:30 p.m. Saturday at Griffin-Leggett by Rev. K. Alvin Pitt. Pallbearers will be Harrol Milligan, Carmel White, Jerry Harmon, O.L. Tucker, Vic Bryont and Dave Calhoun. Burial will be at Pine Crest Memorial Park.

More About G EORGE F RED M C G RAW :

Burial: 05 June 1971, Buried, Pincrest Memorial Cemetery, Alexander, Saline Co., AR

Church Affiliation: Member of Baring Cross Baptist Church.

Fact 9: Member Veterans of Foreign Wars, post #2576, Ark Travere, LR, AR

Fact 10: Member Oil, Chimical & Atomic Workers International Union

Fact 11: Member International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers

Fact 12: State of issue: AR

Fact 13: Social Security #: 431-01-0552

Military Record 1: US Navy

Military Record 2: 28 December 1951, Honorable Discharge from the Armed Forces of the United States of America's US Navy

Occupation: Buckeye Oil Mill

Residence: 409 East 20th Street, North Little Rock, AR

Marriage Notes for H ENRIE A KINS and G EORGE M C G RAW :

Groom: George McGraw of Little Rock, Pulaski Co., Arkansas, aged 21and

Bride: Henrie Mae Akins of Little Rock, Pulaski Co., Arkansas, aged 19

Date rites performed: 17 Apr 1940 by: W. J. Canaday, Justice of the Peace.

Source: Marriage License, Saline Co., AR, recorded in Book 5, page 481.

Children of H ENRIE A KINS and G EORGE M C G RAW are:

16. i. GEORGE WAYNE11 MCGRAW, b. Private.

17. ii. LLOYD WILLIAM MCGRAW, b. 28 November 1943, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR d. 21 April 1969, St. Vincent Infirmary, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR.

18. iii. LARRY FRED MCGRAW, b. Private.

19. iv. LILLIE SHARON MCGRAW, b. Private.

13. JOHN T HOMAS " J ACK" 10 A KINS, S R. (BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 05 February 1924 in Bauxite, Bauxite Township, Saline Co., AR, and died 04 October 1982 in Doctors Hospital, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR. He married (1) L ILLIAN V IRGINIA G ARRISON Private. She was born Private. He married (2) L ILLIAN V IRGINIA M OORE Private. She was born Private. He married (3) JUANITA J OYCE " N ITA" F OILES Private, daughter of WOODSON F OILES and LYDIA J OHNSON . She was born Private.

Notes for JOHN T HOMAS " J ACK" A KINS, S R. :

State of Arkansas, Bureau of Vital Statistics, File No. WEW-872, Vol. 21, Page 2180

Place of Birth: Saline Co, Bauxite Township

Full Name of Child: John Thomas Akins Date of birth: February 5, 1924, 5 p.m.

Father: B. H. Akins Mother: Lillie Belle May

Fathers age: 34 Mothers age: 20

Place of Birth: Alabama Place of Birth: Mississippi

Occupation: Common Laborer Occupation: Housewife

Children born this Mother: 3

1930 Census of Pulaski Co., AR, Big Rock Twp., 4017 21St., Little Rock, ED 37, Sh 20a, family 460, Vol 57, Enumerated on 12 Apr 1930

Akins, B. Henry head 30 md at 20 AR AR AR

Lilly Belle wife 25 md at 15 AR AR AR

Charles son 1 0/12 AR AR AR

Arkansas Department of Health, Division of Vital Records

Decedent: John Thomas Akins, Sr. Date of death: October 4, 1982

Place of death: Doctors Hosp., Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

State of birth: Arkansas Surviving spouse: Juanita J. Foiles

Social Security No.: 429-26-1454 Occupation: Retd Navy and Post Office

Residence: 405 Puryer, Dumas, Desha Co., Arkansas

Father: Benjamin H. Akins Mother: Lillian May

Informant: Juanita Akins, 405 Puryer, Dumas, AR

Burial: Oct. 6, 1982, Rest Hills, Pulaski Co., AR

Funeral Home: Griffin Legget Healey & Roth, 5800 W. 12th, Little Rock, AR

Immediate Cause of death: Congestive Heart Failure

Called VA Headstone & Marker Division, Washington 1-800-697-6947

Niche Bronze Markers 8.5 in x 5.5 in for mausoleums for those that don't have information engraved in.

Headstones are only for those who have unmarked graves. Can't get any thing for Dad now. gma

Obituary of John Thomas "Jack" Akins, Arkansas Democrate, Wednesday, October 6, 1982, p. 11c:

John Thomas Akins Sr., 58, of DUMAS, formerly of Bauxite, a retired postal employee, died

Monday. Akins was a member of the U.S. Navy Fleet Reserve, Branch 282. Survivors are

his wife, Mrs. Juanita J. Foiles Akins three sons, John Thomas Akins Jr. of Sherwood,

George Michael Akins of North Little Rock and Shawn L. Akins of Dumas two brothers,

Robert B. Akins of North Little Rock and Charles W. Akins of Jacksonville a sister, Mrs.

Henrie Mae McGraw of North Little Rock and three grandchildren. Funeral will be at 11

a.m. Thursday at Rest Hills Funeral Home by the Rev. Rick Erwin, Burial will be in Rest

Hills cemetery. Memorials may be made to the American Heart Association. The family

Unknown or undated Newspaper Obituary:

John Thomas Akins Sr., 58, of Dumas, a retired Postal Service employee, Monday.

Survivors include tow sons, John Thomas Akins Jr. of Sherwood and George Michael

Akins of North Little Rock two brothers, Robert B. Akins of North Little Rock, and

Charles W. Akins of Jacksonville and a sister, Henrie Mae McGraw of North Little Rock.

Funeral 11 a.m. Thursday at Rest Hills Funeral Home.

One of the Ships he was on:

USS LSM-397, a 520-ton medium landing ship, was built at Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina. Commissioned in July 1945, she served with the Atlantic Fleet for her entire Navy career, initially with the Amphibious Force. She was reassigned to the Service Force in about May 1954. LSM-397 decommissioned in February 1958 and was sold in May 1958.

More About JOHN T HOMAS " J ACK" A KINS, S R. :

Burial: 07 October 1982, Rest Hills Memorial Park Cemetery, No. Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

Cause of Death: Conjestive Heart failure due to or as a consequence of ASHD

Funeral Home: Rest Hills Funeral Home by Rev. Rick Erwin

Medical Information: He was 58 years old at his death.

Military Record 1: 07 September 1940, Discharged from Battery A 206th Coast Artillery (AA), Arkansas National Guard.

Military Record 2: Bet. 23 November 1944 - 03 January 1945, SERVSCOLOND, USNTC, San Diego, CA, Student,

Military Record 3: 16 May 1944, Selective Service rejected his letter asking to be reclassified from 4F to 1A because of Active Tuberculosis Minimal and Traumatic Syndrome.

Military Record 4: Bet. 09 June 1944 - 23 October 1963, United States Navy, Washington, D.C.

Military Record 5: Bet. 14 June - 23 November 1944, USNTC, San Diego, CA., training

Military Record 6: 09 June 1944, Enlisted at NRS, LR., AR as AS = apprentice Seaman.

Military Record 7: Bet. 24 October - 20 November 1945, USNRS, Shoemaker, CA., S/l

Military Record 8: Bet. 27 December 1945 - 03 January 1946, Navy #3002, FPO, San Francisco, CA.

Military Record 9: Bet. 03 January - 24 October 1945, RECSTA, Treasure Illsand, San Francisco, CA.

Military Record 10: 20 February 1946, Discharged and paid travel allowance from Wilmington, CA to LR, AR. He was Seaman First Class

Military Record 11: 21 February 1946, Re-enlisted US Navy

Military Record 12: Bet. 07 - 16 October 1946, Naval Base, Charleston, SC., student

Military Record 13: Bet. 29 October 1946 - 08 December 1948, US. NAVPHI Base, Little Creek, VA.

Military Record 14: Bet. 03 January - 28 June 1946, USS LCI (L) 4048 (Pacflt)

Military Record 15: Bet. 11 December 1948 - 10 October 1949, USS FREMONT APA 44 (LANTFL7).

Military Record 16: Bet. 10 October 1949 - 21 October 1952, BOAT #2, NAVPHIBASE, Little Creek, VA.

Military Record 17: 08 March 1950, He engaged in the Amphibious Airborne Invasion of Nieques.

Military Record 18: 07 July 1950, Completed L-11 Cold Weather Landing Craft School

Military Record 19: Bet. 22 October 1952 - 31 March 1954, USS LST1071 (LANTFLT)

Military Record 20: Bet. 31 March 1954 - 07 January 1956, USS YOG 107 (LANTFLT)

Military Record 21: Bet. 07 January 1955 - 25 February 1957, USS LSM 397 (LANTFLT)

Military Record 22: Bet. 06 March 1957 - 27 February 1958, USS SHAKORI ATF 162 (LANTFLT)

Military Record 23: Bet. 28 February 1958 - 29 May 1959, USS SHASTA AE 6 (LANTFLT)

Military Record 24: 16 November 1959, Re-enlisted for six (6) years. Grade or Rank: EN1 (E-6) Living at 4011Pleasant Ave,Norfolk, Norfolk Co., VA.

Military Record 25: Bet. 17 November 1959 - 29 July 1960, USS ORION AS 18 (LANTFLT)

Military Record 26: Bet. 29 May - 16 November 1959, U.S. NAVPHIBASE, Little Creek, VA.

Military Record 27: Bet. 24 September 1960 - 30 July 1962, USS ORION AS 18 (LANTFLT)

Military Record 28: Bet. 29 July - 23 September 1960, NAVSCOLCOMD, Norfolk, VA.

Military Record 29: Bet. 20 August - 02 October 1962, NAVSCOLCORD, Norfolk, VA.

Military Record 30: Bet. 09 October 1962 - 23 October 1963, USNTC, Bainbridge, MD.

Military Record 31: 08 June 1962, Department of the Navy Sixth Good Conduct Award, Engineman first Class, U.S. Navy

Military Record 32: 23 October 1963, Transferred from US Navy active duty to US Navy Fleet Reserve after 20 years of service.

Occupation 1: Bet. 24 February 1941 - 08 April 1942, (CCC) Civilian Conservation Corps.

Occupation 2: Bet. 1942 - 1943, Colonial Baking Co., 115 Cross St., LR, AR.

Occupation 3: Bet. 1943 - 1944, Union Pacific Coal Co., Reliance, Wyoming.

Occupation 4: Bet. 01 August 1960 - 30 June 1963, Held extra job while in US Navy, leased Milts- Tr. Park, 4011Pleasent Ave., Norfolk, VA, from LA Milton.

Occupation 5: Bet. 01 November 1962 - 20 October 1963, Held second job while in US Navy, at E.& J. Kibler Const. Co., Finksburg, MD.

Occupation 6: Bet. 28 October 1963 - 04 October 1982, Owned and operated Akins Trailer Ranch, Rt. #1, Box 282, Jacksonville, Pulaski Co., AR.

Occupation 7: Bet. 01 February - 27 June 1964, Guards Mark Inc., 22 S. 2nd St. Mps.,TN

Retirement 1: 01 April 1975, from the United States Navy, Engineman First Class

Retirement 2: from the US Post Office

Social Security Number: Social Security #: 429-26-1454, State of Issue: AR

Children of JOHN A KINS and JUANITA F OILES are:

20. i. JOHN THOMAS11 AKINS, JR., b. Private.

21. ii. GEORGE MICHAEL AKINS, b. Private.

22. iii. SHAWN LEE AKINS, b. Private.

14. R OBERT B UCKLEY " B OB" 10 A KINS (BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 05 February 1926 in Bauxite, Saline Co., AR, and died 09 June 2000 in Baptist Medical Center, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR. He married D OROTHY M AE E LLIS Private, daughter of B URTON E LLIS and M OLLY B URKE . She was born Private.

Notes for R OBERT B UCKLEY " B OB" A KINS :

1930 Census of Pulaski Co., AR, Big Rock Twp., 4017 21St., Little Rock, ED 37, Sh 20a, family 460, Vol 57, Enumerated on 12 Apr 1930

Akins, B. Henry head 30 md at 20 AR AR AR

Lilly Belle wife 25 md at 15 AR AR AR

Charles son 1 0/12 AR AR AR

Gazette Carrier Boy saves $600 from his work in spare time delivering paper. The article tells of him being inducted into the armed service the following Tuesday. Bob carried papers for the Gazette for 3 years. He paid his younger brother (That would be Chuck) $9 a week to help him deliver his 650 customers.

News paper article, date unknown

Pvt. Robert B. Akins, aged 18, of the paratroopers, stationed at Fort Benning, GA will return to his base tomorrow after a 14 day furlough with his parents here. He received basic training at Camp Fannin, TX. He has a brother, Seaman 2-C John T. Akins stationed at San Diego, Cal.

Newspaper article dated 15 Apr 1982:

Robert Akins, 56, of 4703 Francis St. a plant operator at AP&L Co.'s Lynch Station since 1978, has been promoted to shift operation supervisor.

He joined AP&L in 1946. He was promoted to helper at the Lynch Station in 1950 and also served as a treating plant operator at Lynch.

Arkansas Democrat Gazette, Sunday, June 11, 2000

Robert B. Akins, 74, of North Little Rock died June 9, 2000. He was preceded in death by his parents, Henry and Lilly Belle Akins brothers, Jack and Charles and sister, Henrie Mae McGraw. He is survived by his wife of 48 years, Dorothy Mae Ellis Akins his twin daughters and their husbands, Linda Kay and Tom Reagan of Madison, Miss., and Brenda Mae and Hal Shults of Austin, Texas and his five grandchildren, Michelle and Marc Reagan and B.J., Elizabeth, and John Curtis Shults.

Mr. Akins served with the 82nd Airborne Paratroopers in Europe during World War II and with the Army in the Korean War and became a member of the Disabled American Veterans. He retired after 40 years of service with Entergy/AP&L. He was a member of Levy United Methodist Church, serving on several committees and as a member of the Disciples Sunday School Class. He really enjoyed photography, traveling, working in his yard, and most of all playing with his grandkids.

Funeral services will be 10 a.m. Monday, June 12, at Levy United Methodist Church with the Rev. Sam B. Williams Jr. and Dr. David W. Bush officiating. Entombment will be at Rest Hills Memorial Park Mausoleum. The family will receive friend from 2 to 4 p.m. today at Roller-Owens Funeral Home, 5509JFK, North Little Rock, 791-7400. Memorials may be make to the Levy United Methodist church.

More About R OBERT B UCKLEY " B OB" A KINS :

Burial: 12 June 2000, Rest Hills Memorial Park Cemetery, No. Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

Cause of Death: Complications after heart surgery

Church Affiliation: Methodist

Diploma: 1982, Promoted to shift operating supervison.

Military Record: US Army, WWII and Korea paratrooper.

Occupation: AP&L Co. plant operator

Places lived: Bauxite, NLR, AR Camp Fannin, TX Ft. Benning, GA

Residence: 06 October 1982, North Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

More About R OBERT A KINS and D OROTHY E LLIS :

Children of R OBERT A KINS and D OROTHY E LLIS are:

23. i. LINDA KAY (TWIN)11 AKINS, b. Private.

24. ii. BRENDA MAE (TWIN) AKINS, b. Private.

15. C HARLES W ILLIAM " C HUCK" 10 A KINS (BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 30 August 1928 in Fordyce, Dallas Co., AR, and died 24 August 1991 in Jacksonville, Pulaski Co., AR. He married R EBECCA S UE E LLIOTT 06 September 1953 in Mindon, Douglas Co., Nev, daughter of J AMES E LLIOTT and L ILLIAN B RADFORD . She was born 23 December 1936 in Martin, Weakley Co., Tenn, and died 23 January 2000 in Jacksonville, Pulaski Co., AR.

Notes for C HARLES W ILLIAM " C HUCK" A KINS :

1930 Census of Pulaski Co., AR, Big Rock Twp., 4017 21St., Little Rock, ED 37, Sh 20a, family 460, Vol 57, Enumerated on 12 Apr 1930

Akins, B. Henry<< head 30 md at 20 AR AR AR

Lilly Belle wife 25 md at 15 AR AR AR

>>Charles<< son 1 0/12 AR AR AR

Undated newspaper articles found in dads papers:

Charles was one of 27 crew members of the destroy USS Walke awarded silver stars in the San Francisco Naval Shipyards Thursday. The ship struck a mine June 12 in Wansan harbor, Korea, killing 26 and wounding 40.

USS Walke, a 1570-ton Sims class destroyer built at the Boston Navy Yard, Massachusetts, was commissioned in April 1940. The following summer, she cruised to Brazil and Argentina, then spent the rest of 1940 and nearly all of 1941 in the Caribbean and North Atlantic, taking part in tests, making Neutrality Patrols and conducting "short of war" operations between the U.S. east coast and Iceland.

In December 1941, soon after the U.S. entered World War II, Walke went to the Pacific to join in the fight against Japan. She accompanied the aircraft carrier Yorktown during some of her early combat actions in the central and south Pacific. During the Battle of Coral Sea in early May, she operated with the Support Group of cruisers and destroyers that endured attacks by both Japanese and U.S. land-based bombers, fortunately without significant damage to the ships.

Following an overhaul, Walke returned to the south Pacific in September 1942 to support the ongoing Guadalcanal Campaign. Following two months of escort duties, she was attached to Rear Admiral Willis A. Lee's battleship task force and sent on a mission to stop the Japanese from bombarding the U.S. airfield on Guadalcanal. In the resulting second major surface action of the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, on 15 November 1942, USS Walke was sunk by Japanese torpedoes and gunfire, with the loss of more than a third of her crew.

Obituary of CHARLES W. AKINS unknown paper

Jacksonville- Charles William Akins, 62, of Jacksonville, died Saturday, August 24, in Jacksonville.

A native of Fordyce, he was retired from Worthen Bank, a member of the McArthur Drive Church of Christ, the Disabled American Veterans of America, Masonic Lodge 216, the Scottish Rite and the Scimitar Shrine Temple and was retired from the U.S. Air Force where he served with the occupation forces in Germany after World War II and in the Korean Conflict and Vietnam.

He received the Silver Star, Air Force Accommodation Medal, Army Occupation Medal, China Service Medal, Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Ribbon, United Nations Medal, Korean Service Medal, Navy Occupation Ribbon, Air Force Longevity Service Award Ribbon with one bronze oak leaf clusters, Vietnam Service Award with bronze star, the Public of Vietnam Campaign medal and a small arms expert marksmanship ribbon.

Survivors include his wife, Rebecca Sue Akins, two sons, Danny Akins of Russellville and Ron Akins of Jacksonville, two daughters, Deborah S. Hope and Dawn Porterfield, both of Jacksonville, one brother, Robert B. Akins of North Little Rock: seven grandchildren and several nieces, nephews, aunts, and uncles.

Services will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Mcarthur Drive Church of Christ with Bill Graddy officiating.

Burial will be in Rest Hills Memorial Park under the direction of Griffin Leggett Rest Hills Funeral Home.

Funeral Services were performed at McArthur Dr. Church of Christ, Jacksonville, AR by Bill Graddy.

More About C HARLES W ILLIAM " C HUCK" A KINS :

Baptism: Jacksonville, Pulaski Co., AR

Burial: 27 August 1991, Rest Hills Memorial Park Cemetery, No. Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

Church Affiliation: Church of Christ

Military Record: Retired, US Air Force, was also in the ARMY before entering the AirForce

Occupation: US Navy and Retired from US Air Force

Places lived: Spain Japan Jacksonville, AR

Residence 1: 608 Poplar, Jacksonville, AR 72076

Residence 2: 06 October 1982, Jacksonville, Pulaski Co., AR

Social Security Number: 432-30-7525, State of issue: AR

Notes for R EBECCA S UE E LLIOTT :

Obituary, Pulaski Co., Arkansas Democrat Gazette, Tuesday, January 25, 2000

Rebecca Sue Akins, 63, of Jacksonville went to be with the Lord, Jan. 23, 2000. She was a member of church of Christ and past member of the Eastern star. Proceeded by death by her husband, Charles Akins. Survivors include two sons, Danny Akins of Pottsville, Ark, and Ron Akins of Jacksonville two daughters, Deborah Hope and Dawn Porterfield both of Jacksonville mother, Lillian Elliott of LaVerne, Tenn., eight grandchildren, Tamara Akins, Matthew Akins, Ronny Akins, Jeffrey Akins, Patrick Hope, Tiffany Hope, Brittney Porterfield, and Dustin Porterfield on brother, James C. Elliott of LaVerne, Tenn., one sister, Viola Roberts of Ranchero Cordova, Calif. Visitation will be from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. today (Jan.25) at Griffin Leggett-Rest Hills, North Little Rock. Graveside services will be at 2 p.m. Wednesday, (Jan. 26) at Rest Hills Memorial Park. Arrangements by Griffin Leggett-Rest Hills.

Akins Rebecca Sue d. 1/23/2000, Jacksonville aged 63 Preceded: Husband, Charles Akins Survived: Sons, Danny Akins, Ron AKins Daughters, Deborah Hope and Dawn Porterfield Mother, Lillian Elliott Grandchildren, Tamara Akins, Matthew Akins, Ronny Akins, Jeffrey Akins, Patrick Hope, Tiffany Hope, Brittney Porterfield, Dustin Porterfield Brother, James C. Elliott Sister, Viola Roberts Interment: Rest Hills Memorial Park adg1/25/2000

More About R EBECCA S UE E LLIOTT :

Burial: 26 January 2000, Rest Hills Memorial Park Cemetery, No. Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

Church Affiliation: Church of Christ

More About C HARLES A KINS and R EBECCA E LLIOTT :

Marriage: 06 September 1953, Mindon, Douglas Co., Nev

Children of C HARLES A KINS and R EBECCA E LLIOTT are:

25. i. DANNY WILLIAM11 AKINS, b. Private.

26. ii. RONALD DENNIS AKINS, SR., b. Private.

27. iii. DEBORAH SUE "DEBBIE" AKINS, b. Private.

28. iv. DAWN RENEE' AKINS, b. Private.

16. G EORGE W AYNE 11 M C G RAW (H ENRIE M AE 10 A KINS , BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. He married S ARA L EE H OOVER Private, daughter of R AY H OOVER and N OLA W HITMAN . She was born Private.

More About G EORGE M C G RAW and S ARA H OOVER :

Child of G EORGE M C G RAW and S ARA H OOVER is:

i. KEITH BRADLEY12 MCGRAW, b. Private m. (1) ALLISON LEIGH HILL, Private b. Private m. (2) JODEE BEAL, Private b. Private.

17. L LOYD W ILLIAM 11 M C G RAW (H ENRIE M AE 10 A KINS , BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born 28 November 1943 in Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR, and died 21 April 1969 in St. Vincent Infirmary, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR. He married (1) V ICKY A NN C LAMON Private. She was born Private. He married (2) E VELYN L OUISE M ANN Private. She was born Private. He married (3) S UZANNE P RUETT Private, daughter of R OY L . P RUETT . She was born Private.

Notes for L LOYD W ILLIAM M C G RAW :

20 Apr 1969, Little Rock Police Report, 11.30pm.

On my arrival I found Lloyd W. MCGRAW lying in front room floor with feet facing door and in a large pool of blood around subject head and bleeding profusely with an apparently bullet wound. In right side of head near temple, a .22 Cal. star auto pistol #620881 was lying on table next to subject. Pistol stored at hq. along with a spend round which was found on floor near subject. Subject was taken to St. Vincent by A-1 ambulance and was attended by Dr. Judd and Wade and placed on critical list. Still alive at time of the report. I interviewed Mrs. Pruett and she stated her daughter Suzanne who was married to Lloyd had came home about a week ago to live with her (left Lloyd) and tonight Lloyd came over to her house and knocked her aside as he entered and went directly to her bedroom where she kept her pistol and got this pistol and went back into living room and shot himself with it. Mrs. Pruett then picked up the pistol and called for an ambulance. Suzanne, Mrs. McGRAW gave same story as her mother. Lloyd parents notified by P.D. and came to hosp. subject later died at hosp., notified by radio 3:59 a.m.

Unnamed newspaper article:

Man shot in head dies at hospital

Lloyd W. McGraw, 23, 6208 Longwood, died in Little Rock Hospital today after he was shot at 11:30 p.m. Sunday at Fairmont.

Police reports said the wound was self-inflicted, The incident occurred at the home of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Roy Pruett, where McGraw's wife, Suzanne, had moved.

McGraw suffered a wound in the head from a .22-caliber pistol

22 Apr 1969 Ark Gazette, dated Tues., April 22, 1969

Lloyd McGraw, 25 yrs old at death, lived at 6208 Longwood Rd. Fatally shot in the head with a .22-caliber pistol about 11 p.m. Sunday, 20 April, at the home of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Roy Pruett. It was apparently self-inflicted. He was taken to St. Vincent where he died about 5 hours later, 21 Apr 1969.

Newspaper obituary, unknown paper or date:

Funeral for Lloyd William McGraw, 25, 6208 Longwood Road, who was fatally shot in the head about 11 p.m. Sunday, was at 2:30 p.m. today in Healey & Roth Chapel by Rev. Donald Campbell. Pallbearers were Harral Milliagn, Skipper Spence, Wallace Blaylock, Herman Powelke, Raymond Stracener and Butch Mathis. Burial was in Pine Crest Memorial Park. Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Suzanna Pruett a daughter, Miss Ann McGraw his parents, Mr. And Mrs. George McGraw of North Little Rock two brothers, George Wayne McGraw of Little Rock and Larry Fred McGraw of North Little Rock, and his grandparents, Mr. And Mrs. Arthur McGraw of Little Rock.

More About L LOYD W ILLIAM M C G RAW :

Burial: 22 April 1969, Buried, Pinecrest Cemetery, Alexander, Saline Co., AR

Cause of Death: Gun shot wound.

Church Affiliation: Member of Westover Hills Presbyterian Church

Fact 8: 21 April 1969, Date of Death on Headstone inscription.

Occupation: Interior Decorator with Southern Decorators, Inc.

Places lived: 409 East 20th Street, North Little Rock, AR

Child of L LOYD M C G RAW and V ICKY C LAMON is:

Child of L LOYD M C G RAW and E VELYN M ANN is:

18. L ARRY F RED 11 M C G RAW (H ENRIE M AE 10 A KINS , BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. He married K ATHRYN P ETERSON B AILEY Private, daughter of W ILLIAM B AILEY and J ANE ? . She was born Private.

Children of L ARRY M C G RAW and K ATHRYN B AILEY are:

i. BENJAMIN BAILEY12 MCGRAW, b. Private.

ii. MOLLY MADELINE MCGRAW, b. Private.

19. L ILLIE S HARON 11 M C G RAW (H ENRIE M AE 10 A KINS , BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. She married T OMMY R AY E UBANKS Private, son of J AMES E UBANKS and I DA W ARD . He was born Private.

Children of L ILLIE M C G RAW and T OMMY E UBANKS are:

i. HANNAH MARIE12 EUBANKS, b. Private.

ii. DILLON RAY EUBANKS, b. Private.

20. J OHN T HOMAS 11 A KINS, J R. (JOHN T HOMAS " J ACK" 10, BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. He married (1) J UDY B LANKENSHIP Private. She was born Private. He married (2) L INDA A NN S HOCK Private, daughter of A NDREW S HOCK and A URORA L ANE . She was born Private.

Children of J OHN A KINS and L INDA S HOCK are:

i. CRYSTAL LYNN12 AKINS, b. Private m. (1) MICHAEL G. NORRIS, Private b. Private m. (2) MICHAEL CHAD WINKLER, Private b. Private.

ii. JOHN THOMAS AKINS III, b. Private.

21. GEORGE M ICHAEL 11 A KINS (JOHN T HOMAS " J ACK" 10, BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. He married (1) R EGINA G AYLE B ARTLEY Private, daughter of E LDON B ARTLEY and G ERALDEAN N AYLOR . She was born Private. He married (2) S HERREE A NNETTE V INT Private, daughter of J AMES V INT and B ETTY S PECK . She was born Private. He married (3) C ONNIE M ARTINA F INCH Private, daughter of F RITZ F INCH and O NEDIA T HOMAS . She was born Private. He married (4) L INDA S UE W ARNER Private, daughter of E VATT W ARNER and J OY B REWER . She was born Private. He married (5) M ARGIE L YNN H ARRIS Private, daughter of C HESTER H ARRIS and A LBERTA B AIRETT . She was born Private.

Child of GEORGE A KINS and C ONNIE F INCH is:

i. NANCY JEANETTE12 AKINS, b. Private m. (1) JEREMY WAYNE HUGGINS, Private b. Private m. (2) JOSEPH ERIC CARPENTER, Private b. Private.

22. S HAWN L EE 11 A KINS (JOHN T HOMAS " J ACK" 10, BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. He married (1) L ADANNA R YE Private. She was born Private. He married (2) P OLLY B OUCHER Private. She was born Private. He married (3) J O E LLA M C C LENNEY Private, daughter of L EWIS M C C LENNEY and J OYCE G ATES . She was born Private.

Child of S HAWN A KINS and J O M C C LENNEY is:

i. MARISSA MELODY12 AKINS, b. Private m. GREGORY DANE SHAW, Private b. Private.

23. L INDA K AY (TWIN) 11 A KINS (R OBERT B UCKLEY " B OB" 10, BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. She married T HOMAS D ALE R EAGAN Private, son of H ERBERT R EAGAN and M ARY W ILLIAMS . He was born Private.

Children of L INDA A KINS and T HOMAS R EAGAN are:

i. BRENDA MICHELLE12 REAGAN, b. Private.

ii. MARC THOMAS REAGAN, b. Private.

24. B RENDA M AE (TWIN) 11 A KINS (R OBERT B UCKLEY " B OB" 10, BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. She married H AROLD L OYD S HULTS Private, son of H AROLD S HULTS and B EVERLY W REN . He was born Private.

Children of B RENDA A KINS and H AROLD S HULTS are:

i. ROBERT JOSEPH12 SHULTS, b. Private.

ii. LINDA ELIZEBETH SHULTS, b. Private.

iii. JOHN CURTIS SHULTS, b. Private.

25. D ANNY W ILLIAM 11 A KINS (C HARLES W ILLIAM " C HUCK" 10, BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. He married (1) V ICKI J EANNE M UENCH Private. She was born Private. He married (2) M ARILYN K AYE M OORE Private, daughter of D ELON M OORE and M AXINE F REEMAN . She was born Private.

Children of D ANNY A KINS and V ICKI M UENCH are:

i. TAMARA DENISE12 AKINS, b. Private m. DOUG ?, Private b. Private.

ii. MATTHEW DANIEL AKINS, b. Private.

26. R ONALD D ENNIS 11 A KINS, S R. (C HARLES W ILLIAM " C HUCK" 10, BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. He married J UDY G AIL B URGESS Private, daughter of J IMMIE B URGESS and G LORIA K NOWLES . She was born Private.

Children of R ONALD A KINS and J UDY B URGESS are:

i. RONALD DENNIS12 AKINS, JR., b. Private.

ii. JEFFREY CHARLES AKINS, b. Private.

27. D EBORAH S UE " D EBBIE" 11 A KINS (C HARLES W ILLIAM " C HUCK" 10, BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. She married G REGORY P ATRICK H OPE Private. He was born Private.

Children of D EBORAH A KINS and G REGORY H OPE are:

i. GREGORY PATRICK12 HOPE II, b. Private.

ii. TIFFANY RAE "TIFF" HOPE, b. Private m. (1) AARON JOHNSON, Private b. Private m. (2) DOUGLAS LOUIE, Private b. Private.

28. D AWN R ENEE' 11 A KINS (C HARLES W ILLIAM " C HUCK" 10, BENJAMIN H ENRY " B EN" 9, ELIZABETH J ANE 8 B LALOCK , JOHN H ASTIN " J ACK" 7, ROBERT A NDERSON 6, THOMAS5, MILLINGTON4, JOHN W ILLIAM 3, THOMAS2, THOMAS1) was born Private. She married C ARY W AYNE P ORTERFIELD Private. He was born Private.

Children of D AWN A KINS and C ARY P ORTERFIELD are:

i. BRITTNEY DAWNAE12 PORTERFIELD, b. Private.

ii. AMANDA PORTERFIELD, b. 11 December 1990 d. 11 December 1990.

More About AMANDA PORTERFIELD:

Medical Information: Died at 10 hours old.

iii. TYLER PORTERFIELD, b. Private.


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