Douglas XC-114

Douglas XC-114



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Douglas XC-114

The Douglas XC-114 was a lengthened and re-engined version of the C-54 Skymaster. It had a 100ft 7in long fuselage, up from 93ft 10in on the C-54, and was powered by four 1,620hp Allison V-1710-131 twelve-cylinder liquid cooled engines. Empty weight went up by 6,670lb, loaded weight by 9,000lb and maximum weight by 7,500lb. The prototype XC-114 was somewhat heavier than any version of the C-54. At 306mph its top speed was markedly better than any of the C-54s, but its cruising speed of 198mph was no faster, and it had had a worse combination of range and payload than either the C-54D or C-54G. A second prototype was completed, as the XC-116, with thermal de-icing equipment, but no production aircraft followed.

Engines: Allison V-1710-131
Power: 1,150hp at 14,700ft, 1,620hp at take-off
Wing span: 117ft 6in
Length: 100ft 7in
Height: 34ft
Empty weight: 45,600lb
Loaded weight: 71,000lb
Maximum weight: 80,500lb
Maximum speed: 306mph at 17,500ft
Cruising speed: 198mph at 14,700ft
Service ceiling: 26,000ft
Range: 3,500 miles with 10,000lb payload


Douglas XC-114 - History

Clear-cast canopy & decal

In 1959, the U.S.A.F. issued a requirement for a jet powered, fast and strategic transport aircraft that would serve as a "work horse " for rapidly moving U.S. Army troops anywhere in the world. Lockheed responded to the requirement with the Model 300 and was received contract for five test-aircrafts to be designated C-141. Although operational testing continue, the Air Force needs due the involvement in South Vietnam soon had production aircraft C-141A involved in operational sorties to the combat zone. In 1965, the first operational C-141A delivery to units of the MATS. Soon the C-141A made flights almost daily to Southeast Asia. In January 1973, the Paris Peace Accords called for a ceasefire along with the withdrawal of US force in South Vietnam and the repatriation of prisoners of war held in North Vietnam. A C-141 66-0177 transported the first group of repatriated POWs from Hanoi to Clark AB, Philippines, so it was picked up nickname Hanoi Taxi. In 1979 MAC initiated a cargo capacity upgrade program for its C-141A fleet. The project added an inflight refueling system and lengthened the fuselage. The stretched C-141A was designated C-141B.

Strategic transport / long-range airlifter

To meet the USAF's "Specific Operational Requirement 182" to replace slower piston-engined cargo planes

4x Pratt & Whitney TF33-P-7 turbofan engine

The Lockheed C-141A Hanoi Taxi package contents secret aircraft kits of three 1/144 Lockheed designs as bonus:

The Lockheed C-141A is suitable to group with the following collection series.


Douglas XC-114 - History

60 resin parts, 3 metal parts

Clear-cast canopy & decal

Shipping charge: US$28.00

In 1959, the U.S.A.F. issued a requirement for a jet powered, fast and strategic transport aircraft that would serve as a "work horse " for rapidly moving U.S. Army troops anywhere in the world. Lockheed responded to the requirement with the Model 300 and was received contract for five test-aircrafts to be designated C-141. Although operational testing continue, the Air Force needs due the involvement in South Vietnam soon had production aircraft C-141A involved in operational sorties to the combat zone. In 1965, the first operational C-141A delivery to units of the MATS. Soon the C-141A made flights almost daily to Southeast Asia. In January 1973, the Paris Peace Accords called for a ceasefire along with the withdrawal of US force in South Vietnam and the repatriation of prisoners of war held in North Vietnam. A C-141 66-0177 transported the first group of repatriated POWs from Hanoi to Clark AB, Philippines, so it was picked up nickname Hanoi Taxi. In 1979 MAC initiated a cargo capacity upgrade program for its C-141A fleet. The project added an inflight refueling system and lengthened the fuselage. The stretched C-141A was designated C-141B.

Strategic transport / long-range airlifter

To meet the USAF's "Specific Operational Requirement 182" to replace slower piston-engined cargo planes

4x Pratt & Whitney TF33-P-7 turbofan engine

The Lockheed C-141A is suitable to group with the following collection series.


Douglas XC-114 - History

39 r esin parts +

clear-cast canopy & decal

In 1956, the USAF issued requirement for a utility transport that used to accomplish the combat flight inspection and navigation mission. Due to the budget cuts, the Air Force asked the industry-financed "off-the-shelf" prototypes. McDonnell submitted company's Model 119 for a small, 4-jets, multi-purpose, ulitity airplane. It will be capable of going anywhere in the world at cruising speeds about 500 miles per hour. The cabin has a wide, flat floor and full headroom throughout, giving a large usable capacity and great flexibility of loading. Since Model 119 approximates the performance of combat jet aircraft, the training of flight crew students in it will be far more effective than in propeller driven trainers and much more economical than utilizing combat jet aircraft for training. In 1959, the Lockheed C-140 won the UCX contract, McDonnell began efforts to market the type commercially.

Utility transport and trainer airplane

To compete for the USAF's UCX (Utility-Cargo Experimental) contract

4x Pratt & Whitney J60 turbofan engine

The McDonnell Model 119 is suitable to group with the following collection series.


Variants

Data from McDonnell Douglas aircraft since 1920   : Volume I [3]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Capacity: 6 or 8 pax / 2,500   lb (1,100   kg) payload
  • Length: 35   ft 4   in (10.77   m)
  • Wingspan: 56   ft 7   in (17.25   m)
  • Height: 14   ft (4.3   m)
  • Wing area: 805   sq   ft (74.8   m 2 )
  • Airfoil: Clark Y [4]
  • Empty weight: 3,836   lb (1,740   kg)
  • Gross weight: 6,443   lb (2,922   kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Liberty V-1650-1 V-12 water-cooled piston engine, 435   hp (324   kW)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed fixed-pitch propeller
  • Maximum speed: 116   mph (187   km/h 101   kn) at sea level
  • Cruise speed: 85   mph (137   km/h 74   kn)
  • Range: 385   mi (335   nmi 620   km)
  • Service ceiling: 14,850   ft (4,530   m)
  • Rate of climb: 645   ft/min (3.28   m/s)
  • Wing loading: 8   lb/sq   ft (39   kg/m 2 )
  • Power/mass: 0.0676   hp/lb (0.1111   kW/kg)

Operational history

During 1956, deliveries to the USAF commenced. A total of 145 RB-66Bs would be produced. In service, the RB-66 would function as the primary night photo-reconnaissance aircraft of the USAF during this period accordingly, many examples served with tactical reconnaissance squadrons based overseas, typically being stationed in the United Kingdom and West Germany. A total of 72 of the B-66B bomber version were built, 69 fewer aircraft than had been originally planned. A total of 13 B-66B aircraft later were modified into EB-66B electronic countermeasures (ECM) aircraft, which played a forward role in the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and were stationed at RAF Chelveston with the 42nd Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, who performed the conversion during the early 1960s. They would rotate out of an alert pad in France during the time that the 42nd had them.

The RB-66C was a specialized electronic reconnaissance and electronic countermeasures (ECM) aircraft according to Gunston and Gilchrist, it was the first aircraft designed from the onset for electronic intelligence (ELINT) missions. [1] It was operated by an expanded crew of seven, which included the additional electronics warfare specialists. A total of 36 of these aircraft were constructed the additional crew members were housed in the space that was used to accommodate the camera/bomb bay of other variants, these aircraft were outfitted with distinctive wingtip pods that accommodated various receiver antennas, which were also present upon a belly-mounted blister. [1] Several RB-66Cs were operated in the vicinity of Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis, they would also be deployed over Vietnam. During 1966, these planes were re-designated as EB-66C.

On 10 March 1964, a 19th TRS RB-66C flying on a photo-reconnaissance mission from the Toul-Rosières Air Base in France, was shot down over East Germany by a Soviet Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21 after it had crossed over the border due to a compass malfunction. The crew ejected from the aircraft and, following a brief period of detention, were repatriated to the United States. [10]


General characteristics

  • Crew: Two (Pilot and copilot)
  • Capacity: 15,000 pounds (6,800   kg) cargo or 40 troops
  • Length: 63   ft 9   in (19.43   m)
  • Wingspan: 95   ft 6   in (29.11   m)
  • Height: 17   ft (5.2   m)
  • Wing area: 987   sq   ft (91.7   m 2 )
  • Empty weight: 11,001   lb (4,990   kg)
  • Gross weight: 26,000   lb (11,793   kg)
  • Maximum speed: 290   mph (470   km/h, 250   kn) max towing speed
  • Cruise speed: 190   mph (305   km/h, 165   kn) gliding speed
  • Stall speed: 35   mph (56   km/h, 30   kn)
  • Maximum glide ratio: 14:1
  • Wing loading: 26.3   lb/sq   ft (128   kg/m 2 )

Construction

In contrast to the Cloudster, which was made of wood, the DT was designed as a mixed construction. The fuselage consisted of welded steel tubes with aluminum cladding on the front and middle part of the fuselage. The rest of the trunk was covered with fabric. The wings were a pure wood construction with fabric covering, as was the vertical stabilizer. The tailplane, on the other hand, was made of tubular steel with fabric covering. The wings could be folded onto the fuselage of the aircraft to save space.


Products

Aircraft

  • Douglas 1211-J
  • Douglas 2229
  • Douglas A-1 Skyraider (1945)
  • Douglas XA-2 (c. 1926)
  • Douglas A-3 Skywarrior (1952)
  • Douglas A-4 Skyhawk (1954)
  • Douglas A-20 Havoc (1938)
  • Douglas A-26 Invader (1942)
  • Douglas A-33 (1941)
  • Douglas A2D Skyshark (1950)
  • Douglas Y1B-7, B-7, O-35 (1931)
  • Douglas B-18 Bolo (1935)
  • Douglas XB-19 (1941)
  • Douglas XB-22 (1930s)
  • Douglas B-23 Dragon (1939)
  • Douglas XB-31
  • Douglas XB-42 Mixmaster, XA-42 Mixmaster (1944)
  • Douglas XB-43 Jetmaster (1946)
  • Douglas B-66 Destroyer (1954)
  • Douglas BTD Destroyer
  • Douglas C-1 (1925)
  • Douglas C-47 Skytrain
    • Douglas AC-47 Spooky
    • Douglas XCG-17
    • List of Douglas DC-3 family variants
    • List of Douglas DC-4 variants

    McDonnell Douglas aircraft

    • DC-9 (1965)
    • DC-10 (1971)
    • YC-15 (1975)
    • MD-80 (1980)
    • MD-11 (1990)
    • C-17 Globemaster III (1991)
    • MD-90 (1993)

    Missiles and spacecraft

    • Roc I
    • AAM-N-2 Sparrow I (1948)
    • MIM-4 Nike Ajax (1959)
    • MGM-5 Corporal
      • WAC Corporal
      • PGM-17 Thor
      • Thor-Able
      • Thor-Ablestar
      • Thor-Agena
      • Thorad-Agena
      • Thor DSV-2
      • Thor DSV-2U
      • Thor-Burner
      • Thor-Delta

      History

      The shoulder- wing aircraft was intended as a supplement to the DC-3 and DC-4 on short routes, for 16 to 22 passengers, and not as a replacement for the DC-3, as was often claimed. The DC-5 attracted the attention of several airlines and orders were received from KLM , British Imperial Airways , Pennsylvania-Central Airlines and Colombian SCADTA before the outbreak of war . Even William Edward Boeing ordered a DC-5 as a private plane, because his own company could not provide a comparable model.

      However, World War II ended the DC-5's career prematurely, and airlines gradually withdrew their orders. Only one prototype, four DC-5s for KLM and seven R3D machines for the US Navy and the US Marine Corps were built. The Dutch DC-5s were used in the evacuation of Java . One KLM DC-5 was captured by the Japanese Army Air Force , and a second was lost in a landing accident. The other two KLM DC-5s were taken over by the United States Army Air Forces and designated as C-110s . The last C-110 was sold and surfaced in Israel in 1948 , where it was used by the Air Force until it was scrapped in 1955 .

      The DC-5 went down in Douglas Aircraft Company history as the “right aircraft at the wrong time”. If the aircraft had been equipped with a pressurized cabin , it would probably have been able to compete with the Convair CV-240 . It is also speculated that Boeing gained knowledge from the DC-5 that was later sold to Fokker . This knowledge should have been the basis for the later Fokker F-27 .

      Not a single Douglas DC-5 exists these days. This makes the DC-5 (after the Douglas DC-1 , of which only one example was built) the second type of aircraft from the DC series that has not been preserved for posterity.


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