USS San Juan (CL-54)

USS San Juan (CL-54)


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USS San Juan (CL-54)

USS San Juan (CL-54) was an Atlanta class light cruiser that fought in the Guadalcanal campaign, the advance up the Solomon Islands, the invasions of the Marshalls, Mariannas, Philippines, Iwo Jima and Okinawa, as well as fighting at the battle of the Philippine Sea. She received 13 battle stars for her World War II service.

The San Juan was launched on 6 September 1941 and commissioned on 28 February 1942. She was the last of the first batch of Atlanta class ships, and thus the last to serve in the critical early battles in the Pacific. The second batch, the slightly modified Oakland group, didn't begin to appear until 1943.

The San Juan left Virginia with the Wasp (CV-7) task group, and accompanied the carrier to the Pacific theatre. They escorted troop transports towards the Solomon Islands, and the upcoming landings on Guadalcanal and Tulagai.

On 7 August 1942 the San Juan provided gun support for the invasion of Tulagi. Although she was in the general area during the Battle of Savo Island (8-9 August 1942), she was with the eastern force and thus missed the actual battle. On the day after the battle the San Juan helped escort the transport ships, which had been missed by the Japanese, back to safety at Noumea.

The San Juan also missed the battle of the Eastern Solomons (24 August 1942), having withdrawn to refuel before the Japanese attacked. The Enterprise (CV-6) was damaged in the battle, and the San Juan helped escort her back to Pearl Harbor for repairs. She reached Pearl on 10 September, and stayed there until 5 October undergoing repairs of her own.

She returned to the fighting via the Gilbert Islands, where she sank two Japanese patrols vessels (16 October 1942). She then joined the Enterprise group on 23 October, three days before the battle of Santa Cruz Island. This saw the Hornet sunk and the Enterprise damaged. San Juan was hit by one dive-bomber, but the bomb passed through her stern without exploding. Several areas were flooded and the rudder was damaged. She was forced to go to Noumea for preliminary repairs and then to Sydney for full repairs.

The San Juan joined the Saratoga(CV-3) group in Fiji on 24 November 1942. She operated from Noumea from then until June 1943, generally working in the Coral Sea. During Operation Toenails, the invasion of New Georgia (June 1943), her carrier group patrolled the Coral Sea for 26 continuous days.

On 1 November the Saratoga hit Japanese airfields on Bougainville and Rabaul as part of the American invasion of Bougainville. San Juan provided part of her escort. In mid-November the same group helped protect the invasion force in the Gilbert Islands.

In early December she joined the Essex (CV-9) for a raid on Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands. Here her anti-aircraft firepower came in very useful as she helped fight off Japanese torpedo bombers. After this she returned to the US for a refit that lasted into January 1943.

The San Juan rejoined the fleet off Pearl Harbor on 19 January 1944, once again operating with the Saratoga. She supported the carrier during the invasion of Eniwetok (February 1944).

On 30 March-1 April the San Juan supported the Yorktown (CV-10) and Lexington (CV-16) in a series of raids on Palau, Yap and Ulithi. In April she escorted the new Hornet (CV-12) as she supported the invasion of Hollandia (Operation Reckless) and then took part in a raid on the Japanese fleet base at Truk.

In June she took part in the invasion of the Mariana Islands, again as part of the Hornet escort group. She supported the Hornet while her aircraft attacked Iwo Jima and Chichi Jima in the Bonin Islands, part of the wider operations to support the invasion of Saipan. She fought in the battle of the Philippine Sea, protecting the Hornet from the failed Japanese air attacks that resulted in the destruction of Japanese naval aviation.

In July she escorted the Wasp (CV-18) and Franklin (CV-13) during the invasion of Guam, once again covering a raid on Iwo Jima and Chichi Jima, and then an attack on Palau and Ulithi. After this she returned to San Francisco for a refit, escorting the Yorktown.

After a short stop at Eniwetok, San Juan escorted carriers, Wasp (CV-18) and Franklin (CV-13), during July as they covered the capture of Guam with strikes on Iwo Jima and Chichi Jima. After a strike on Palau and Ulithi, San Juan was ordered to San Francisco for overhaul, and departed from Eniwetok on 4 August escorting Yorktown at the same time.

The San Juan rejoined the fleet at Ulithi on 21 November, where she was allocated to the Lexington group. In December she was part of the carrier screen during attacks on Formosa and Luzon carried out to support the invasion of Mindoro. She was actually used as bait, approaching within attack range of Japanese airfields, but by now the Japanese were too wary and didn't fall for the trap. She rode out a typhoon on 18-19 December but was back at Ulithi by Christmas.

1945 started with a carrier raid on Formosa, Okinawa and Luzon (3-9 January) then a raid into the South China Sea (10-20 January) in which the carriers hit Saigon, Cam Ranh Bay and Hong Kong. These were all carried out to shield the invasion of Luzon.

In February the San Juan escorted the Hornet during a series of carrier attacks on Tokyo, this time to cover the invasion of Iwo Jima. During April the Hornet group supported the invasion of Okinawa, operating in the area to the north and east of Nansei Shoto. As well as her normal duties, the San Juan carried out a shore bombardment of Minami Daito Shima, 180 miles from Okinawa, on 21 April. During this period aircraft from the Hornet sank the battleship Yamato, although this took place far from the San Juan.

For the rest of the war the San Juan supported the carriers during a series of attacks on the Japanese Home Islands. She took part in the entry of the US 3rd Fleet into Sagami Wan, outside Tokyo Bay on 27 August, after almost two months at sea.

In the immediate aftermath of the arrival in Japan, Commodore Rodger W. Simpson, embarked unit commander on the San Juan, was given the task of looking after the Allied prisoners of war who have been brought to Japan, and evacuating them. He began this task in Tokyo Bay, then moved south to the Nagoya-Hamamatsu area, and finally north to the Sendai-Kamaishi area. This duty was over by 23 September, when she docked at Yokosuka (next to the Nagato, the last remaining Japanese battleship). On 14 November she left for the United States. At Pearl Harbor she dropped off Commodore Simpson and collected a load of homeward bound soldiers. She carried out a second 'magic carpet' trip, between Noumea and Tutuila and San Pedro (1 December 1945-9 January 1946).

On 24 January the San Juan was inactivated. She entered the reserve on 9 November 1946 and was struck off on 1 March 1959. Two years later she was sold for scrap.

Displacement (standard)

6,718t

Displacement (loaded)

8,340t

Top Speed

32.5kts

Range

8,500 nm @ 15kts

Armour – belt

3.75in

- bulkheads

3.75in

- armour deck

1.25in

- gunhouses

1.25in

- deck over underwater magazines

1.25in

Length

541ft 6in oa

Armaments

Sixteen 5in/38 guns (eight two-gun turrets)
Sixteen 1.1in guns (four four-gun positions)
Sixteen 40mm guns (eight double mountings)
Eight 20mm guns
Eight 21in torpedo tubes

Crew complement

623

Laid down

15 May 1940

Launched

6 September 1941

Completed

28 February 1942

Stricken

1 March 1959


USS San Juan (CL-54) - History


This Day in US Navy History – 30Aug

1942 – USS Calhoun (APD 2), is sunk by Japanese land attack planes (Kizarazu and Misawa Kokutais) off Lunga Point. 51 crewmembers die. High speed transport, USS Little (APD 4), and chartered freighter, Kopara, emerge undamaged from the attack.

1944 – U.S. tanker, Jacksonville, steaming in convoy (CU 36), is torpedoed by German submarine (U 482) while en route to Loch Ewe, Scotland the gasoline cargo explodes, giving little chance for the 49-man merchant complement or the 29-man Armed Guard to abandon the blazing ship, which breaks in twain at the second massive explosion. USS Poole (DE 151) rescues a fireman and one Armed Guard gunner, Jacksonville’s only survivors. Escort vessels use depth charges and gunfire to scuttle the after section of the ship the forward section sinks on its own accord. Note, on Nov. 25, 1944, HMS Ascension sinks (U 482) in the North Atlantic of the Shetland Islands.

1945 – Rear Adm. Robert B. Carney and Rear Adm. Oscar C. Badger accept the surrender of Yokosuka Naval Base. The Headquarters of Commander, Third Fleet is then established there. Also on this date, USS San Juan (CL 54) evacuates Allied POWs from Japan.


USS San Juan CL-54 (1942-1946)

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SSN 751 San Juan

The contract to build SSN 751 was awarded on 11/30/1982 and her keel was laid on 08/09/1985. She was launched on 12/06/1986 and she was commissioned on 08/06/1988.

The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS San Juan (SSN 751) returned to Naval Submarine Base New London April 23, 2003 after having its regularly-scheduled six-month deployment extended. San Juan was on patrol in the Mediterranean Sea when it was ordered to the Red Sea - tasked to remain on station and support Tomahawk missile strike operations into Iraq as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

CL-54 / CLAA 54

USS San Juan, a 6000-ton Atlanta class light cruiser built at Quincy, Massachusetts, was commissioned at the end of February 1942. In June of that year, following shakedown in the western Atlantic, she went to the Pacific to join the war against Japan. She arrived in the south Pacific in July, in time to particiate in the initial phases of the prolonged and bitter Guadalcanal Campaign. The cruiser provided gunfire support when U.S. Marines landed on Guadalcanal and Tulagi on 7 August, and served thereafter mainly as an escort for U.S. aircraft carriers. In October 1942, she raided Japanese shipping in the Gilbert Islands and served in the screen during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. San Juan was hit by a Japanese bomb during the latter action, requiring her to steam to Australia for repairs.

For the rest of 1942 and most of 1943, as the fight for Guadalcanal reached a climax and the war moved up through the Central Solomons, San Juan operated with the carriers in the south Pacific. She accompanied USS Saratoga (CV-3) during November 1943 strikes on enemy targets on Bougainville and Rabaul and in covering the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. In early December, she took part in a carrier raid into the Marshall Islands.

After a west coast overhaul, San Juan supported the Marshall Islands invasion in January-February 1944, the extensive attacks on Japanese bases in the central Pacific from then into May, and landings at Hollandia, New Guinea, in April. She served with the carriers through the Marianas operation and the resulting Battle of the Philippine Sea in June and July 1944, and during attacks on the Bonin and Volcano Islands.


USS San Juan (CL-54) - History

Offensive Preparations
July-August 1942



CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
USS ASTORIA CA-34 moored in berth C-3 at Pearl Harbor circa 1-7 July 1942. A new Mk 3 main battery fire control radar has been attached to her forward Mk 38 director. She has also been fitted with blast bags for the first time during the war. The number two turret blast bag has not yet been painted to match her Measure 21 camouflage. This is the only color photograph of ASTORIA CA-34 known to this website. MINNEAPOLIS CA-36 is moored to starboard.
-U.S. Navy photo from NARA collection 80-G-K-452


On 14 June 1942, the day after ASTORIA returned to Pearl Harbor, she underwent a Change of Command Ceremony. CAPT William G. Greenman relieved Francis W. Scanland as 7th commanding officer of the ship. At this time ASTORIA also received upgrades including the addition of new main battery fire control radar and blast bags for her 8" rifles.

After three weeks of refit and at Pearl Harbor, ASTORIA stood out again on 7 July. She sailed in company of Task Force 11 built around USS SARATOGA CV-3. The general consensus among the men was that this was to be a short training run in the vicinity of Hawaii. In reality, Task Force 11 was one of three carrier task forces converging in preparation for America's first offensive of the war.



ASTORIA sailed for the offensive with one civilian aboard--UPI press correspondent Joe J. Custer. Based in Hawaii, Custer had been present for the Japanese attacks on Oahu. He subsequently covered the Doolittle Raid and the Battle of Midway from other Pacific Fleet ships.
-UPI photo reprinted from Custer, Through the Perilous Night


On 8 July, the day after steaming from Pearl Harbor, Task Force 11 stood off the Kona coast of the island of Hawaii. UPI correspondent Joe Custer wrote:

Order of the day: "Bombardment, using live ammunition simulating invasion of enemy island, in coordination with carrier planes." That was the tip-off on our mission we were in on America's first offensive in World War II--bombardment and invasion.


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CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
The aft main battery of ASTORIA CA-34 fires during the simulated bombardment of Kona on 8 July, 1942. Note that her catapults and well deck are empty--her floatplanes are overhead providing gunfire spotting.
-U.S. Navy photo from NARA collection 19-LCM


Custer observed the fire alongside Bill Truesdell, the ship's Gunnery Officer, from the director platform atop Sky Control. He wrote:

Truesdell was pleased with our accuracy in the drill the "Nasty" had a reputation to uphold--she was acknowledged one of the best-shootin' ships in the Navy. Her AA gunners proudly pointed to the miniature Japanese flags painted on their steel gun shields, "notches" for the planes they had bagged.

Directly beneath Sky Control, the port 20-millimeter showed six Rising Suns, the starboard shield, five. There was keen rivalry between the two crews.



CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
Above and below: Following the gunnery practice on 8 July, ASTORIA CA-34 recovers one of her SOC floatplanes to starboard. Note the port plane has already been recovered. Also note that the blast bags on her number three turret have not yet been painted.
-U.S. Navy photo from Brent Jones collection

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CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
-U.S. Navy photo from NARA collection 19-LCM


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Ships of Task Force 11 in formation off Hawaii circa 8 July 1942. Front to back: USS ASTORIA CA-34, VINCENNES CA-44, MINNEAPOLIS CA-36, NEW ORLEANS CA-32, and six DDs.
-U.S. Navy photo from Brent Jones collection


Following the gunnery exercises off Hawaii, Task Force 11 headed south. When the ships crossed the equator on Sunday 12 July, wartime conditions did not prevent a time-honored maritime tradition: the Crossing of the Line ceremonies. First-time "polywogs," Custer included, were inducted into the Royal Order of Trusty Shellbacks by veteran sailors who had previously crossed. "Induction" meant any variety of indignities and abuses--hazing of the highest order.



CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
Perhaps the rarest of ASTORIA CA-34 artifacts. Following the line crossing ceremony, new Trusty Shellbacks were awarded Neptunus Rex certificates commemorating the event. S2/c Chester W. Johnson folded his certificate up and mailed it home just days before the ship took part in the Guadalcanal landings. As a result, this original certificate is one of perhaps a handful (or fewer) that survived the battle. Johnson was wounded but also survived. Note that the certificate displays an inaccurate date and longitude which would have placed ASTORIA off the east coast of Brazil, a measure taken to ensure the certificate did not divulge confidential ship movement information.
-U.S. Navy photo from Brent Jones collection


UPI Correspondent Joe Custer wrote:

We had the word early, on the ASTORIA: We were to join other task forces at sea, to form the largest wartime Naval force in our history. A total of more than fifty major ships--staggering to us. At Wake and Marcus we had ten on the Doolittle raid, perhaps two dozen. But fifty ships! A sizeable force indeed you could get plenty of places with that.

The actual number of ships converging was 76. Three carrier task forces, built around USS SARATOGA, ENTERPRISE and WASP were to meet up with a large number of attack transports with the 1st Marine Division embarked. Their objectives: Tulagi and Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands, a strategic site for airfields in the hands of whichever combatant force held them. In July 1942, they were in Japanese control.



CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
Heavy cruiser USS QUINCY CA-39 anchored in Nuku'alofa Harbor, Tongatapu, Tonga Islands circa 18-23 July 1942. Tongatapu was the final stop for Task Force 18 prior to rendezvous with the two other Carrier Task Forces at Fiji. This color photograph sequence was taken from USS WASP CV-7.
-U.S. Navy photo in NARA collection 80-G-K-563



CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
Light cruiser (anti-aircraft) USS SAN JUAN CL-54 in Nuku'alofa Harbor circa 18-23 July 1942.
-U.S. Navy photo in NARA collection 80-G-K-555



CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
USS QUINCY CA-39 off the starboard beam of PRESIDENT ADAMS AP-38 on 21 July 1942.
-U.S. Navy photo in NARA collection 80-G-K-554


CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
USS PRESIDENT ADAMS AP-38 in Nuku'alofa Harbor, Tongatapu on 21 July 1942. First Division Marines line the rails. The cruiser in the background is USS BOISE CL-47 making a brief stop on her way to Pearl Harbor.
-U.S. Navy photo in NARA collection 80-G-K-556



CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
USS BARKER DD-213 also makes a brief refueling stop on 21 July 1942. In the background USS PRESIDENT JACKSON AP-37, another transport bound for the invasion, takes an oiler alongside.
- U.S. Navy photo in NARA collection 80-G-K-559


CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
BARKER DD-213 approaches oiler KANAWHA AO-1 on 21 July 1942. At right is SAN JUAN CL-54.
- U.S. Navy photo in NARA collection 80-G-K-526


CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
USS BUCHANAN DD-484 underway circa July 1942.
- U.S. Navy photo in NARA collection 80-G-K-421



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HMAS CANBERRA circa July 1942. A Royal Australian Navy whaleboat crosses between CANBERRA and HMAS AUSTRALIA, the source of the photograph.
-RAN photo from Brent Jones collection.

The large groups of ships rendezvoused in the Fiji Islands to reassign and prepare for the invasion, codenamed Operation WATCHTOWER. USS ASTORIA was among the first to arrive and ended up marking time at anchor for a week. Due to the lack of replenishment options, ASTORIA's crew had to closely ration food and water during this period.

Once the remaining fleet elements assembled, rehearsal exercises took place at Koro Island in the heart of the Fiji chain, where preparations could be kept secret. The rehearsal, codenamed Operation DOVETAIL, was problematic and lacked coordination.


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CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
HMAS AUSTRALIA with guns trained to starboard in a photograph likely taken during rehearsal Operation Dovetail off Koro, circa 28-31 July 1942. The guns in the foreground are from the light cruiser HMAS HOBART, source of the image. Royal Australian Navy photography accounts for a significant contribution to images from Operation WATCHTOWER.
-RAN photo from Brent Jones collection.



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The Australian colors flying over HMAS HOBART during the rehearsal exercises in the Fiji Islands.
-RAN photo from Brent Jones collection.


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USS NEW ORLEANS CA-32 (foreground) and ASTORIA CA-34 during Operation DOVETAIL maneuvers off Fiji in late July 1942. Note that both ships are recovering floatplanes to starboard.
-U.S. Navy photo from Brent Jones collection

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CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
An American BAGLEY-class destroyer alongside HMAS HOBART to transfer mail and supplies in rough seas. All eight BAGLEY-class DDs participated in Operation WATCHTOWER.
-RAN photo from Brent Jones collection.


The route taken by the combined American-Australian task forces en route to Guadalcanal in early August 1942, following the completion of rehearsals at Koro.
-manipulated from Google Earth imagery


CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
Light cruiser (anti-aircraft) USS SAN JUAN CL-54.
-RAN photo from Brent Jones collection.


CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
Above: USS SARATOGA CV-3 underway for Operation WATCHTOWER.
Below: ENTERPRISE CV-6 from the same vantage point aboard HMAS AUSTRALIA.
-RAN photos from Brent Jones collection.


CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE


CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
HMAS HOBART from AUSTRALIA in heavy overcast. These two ships were responsible for a large contribution of the surviving photography from Operation WATCHTOWER.
-RAN photo from Brent Jones collection.


CLICK PHOTO TO ENLARGE
Starboard bow view of VINCENNES CA-44 in modified Measure 12 camouflage.
-RAN photo from Brent Jones collection.


ASTORIA CA-34 as the Allied force approaches the Solomon Islands, 6 August 1942. The next morning she and her sister cruisers would provide shore bombardment for the Marines going ashore at Guadalcanal and Tulagi.
- U.S. Navy photo in NARA collection 80-G-013477


Sources
Custer, Joe James. Through the Perilous Night: The Astoria's Last Battle. New York, NY: The MacMillan Company, 1944.

Domagalski, John J. Lost at Guadalcanal. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company Inc., 2010.

Jones, Brent. Private photo and document collection.

Jones, Pat (ed.) The USS ASTORIA (CA-34) and the Men Who Sailed Her. USS ASTORIA Reunion Association. Privately printed, 1992.


USS San Juan (CL-54) - History

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will exceed your Expectations

A great part of naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS San Juan CL 54cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale. You will not be disappointed.

Some of the items in this memory log are as follows:

  • Commissioning and launching
  • History of the San Juan
  • Crossing the equator
  • Many crew activity photos
  • Logistics and ships log
  • Citations and awards
  • LIfe aboard the ship
  • Liberty call and travels
  • Much, much more

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this LIGHT CRUISER during World War II.


CL-54 San Juan

USS San Juan, a 6000-ton Atlanta class light cruiser built at Quincy, Massachusetts, was commissioned at the end of February 1942. In June of that year, following shakedown in the western Atlantic, she went to the Pacific to join the war against Japan. She arrived in the south Pacific in July, in time to particiate in the initial phases of the prolonged and bitter Guadalcanal Campaign. The cruiser provided gunfire support when U.S. Marines landed on Guadalcanal and Tulagi on 7 August, and served thereafter mainly as an escort for U.S. aircraft carriers. In October 1942, she raided Japanese shipping in the Gilbert Islands and served in the screen during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. San Juan was hit by a Japanese bomb during the latter action, requiring her to steam to Australia for repairs.

For the rest of 1942 and most of 1943, as the fight for Guadalcanal reached a climax and the war moved up through the Central Solomons, San Juan operated with the carriers in the south Pacific. She accompanied USS Saratoga (CV-3) during November 1943 strikes on enemy targets on Bougainville and Rabaul and in covering the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. In early December, she took part in a carrier raid into the Marshall Islands.

After a west coast overhaul, San Juan supported the Marshall Islands invasion in January-February 1944, the extensive attacks on Japanese bases in the central Pacific from then into May, and landings at Hollandia, New Guinea, in April. She served with the carriers through the Marianas operation and the resulting Battle of the Philippine Sea in June and July 1944, and during attacks on the Bonin and Volcano Islands.


USS San Juan Holds Change of Command

Photo By Petty Officer 1st Class STEVEN HOSKINS | Cmdr. Douglas Sattler (left) relieves Cmdr. Ravi Desai during a change of command ceremony for the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS San Juan (SSN 751) aboard the historic ship USS Nautilus (SSN 571) at Naval Submarine Base, New London in Groton, Connecticut, August 16, 2019. Capt. David Youtt (center), commander of Submarine Squadron 12, presided over the time-honored naval tradition of the ceremony. Fast-attack submarines are multi-mission platforms, enabling five of the six Navy maritime strategy core capabilities: sea control, power projection, forward presence, maritime security, and deterrence. They are designed to excel in anti-submarine warfare, anti-ship warfare, strike warfare, special operations, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, irregular warfare and mine warfare. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Steven Hoskins) see less | View Image Page

GROTON, CT, UNITED STATES

08.16.2019

Story by Petty Officer 1st Class STEVEN HOSKINS

Naval Submarine Support Center, New London

GROTON, Conn. – Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS San Juan (SSN 751), held a change of command ceremony aboard the historic ship USS Nautilus (SSN 571) at Naval Submarine Base, New London in Groton, Connecticut, Aug. 16, 2019.

Cmdr. Douglas Sattler relieved Cmdr. Ravi Desai during the time-honored ceremony.

Rear Adm. Michael Holland, director, Programming Division, N80, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, served as guest speaker during the ceremony.

“Commander Desai has lead this team superbly,” said Holland. “He has taught the team the San Juan way.”

Desai was recognized during the ceremony for his ability to lead his crew and perform at optimal levels while deployed and during the ship’s maintenance overhaul. Desai closed his speech by thanking his crew.

“It has been an honor and privilege to serve with each and every one of you,” said Desai. “You have inspired me with your dedication, your commitment and your patriotism.”

Desai will serve next as Deputy Commander, Submarine Squadron 12 in Groton.

Sattler thanked Desai for a smooth transition after assuming command of San Juan. “Your care for the San Juan Sailors and their families has been tremendous over the time we’ve spent together these past few weeks. Your leadership, dedication, and commitment to excellence are the foundation of San Juan’s continuing successes.”

When addressing the crew for the first time, Sattler said he looked forward to being part of San Juan’s tradition.

“Thank you for making me a part of the panther family. Your hard work, enthusiasm and perseverance are evident in all that you do, which only helps to solidify the reputation of the San Juan,” said Sattler. “It is a privilege to lead you, and I look forward to being part of San Juan’s continued success.”

Sattler graduated from Wright State University with a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering and a minor in computer science in 2000. He was commission in the Nuclear Propulsion Officer Candidate program in Pensacola, Florida. He also holds a Master’s of Business Administration from Grantham University.

His sea tours include serving as electrical officer, chemistry and radiological controls assistant, tactical systems officer and operations officer aboard USS Wyoming (SSBN 742). He also served as navigator and operations officer aboard USS City of Corpus Christi (SSN 705), and executive officer aboard USS North Carolina (SSN 777).

San Juan is the third ship of the U.S. Navy to be named after San Juan, Puerto Rico. The first San Juan (SP 1352) was acquired by the Navy from the San Juan Packing Company of Seattle, and used as a minesweeper and patrol boat during World War I. The second San Juan (CL 54) was an Atlanta-class anti-aircraft cruiser that served during World War II. When commissioned, San Juan (SSN 751) was the first of the "improved" Los Angeles-class submarines, capable of under-ice operations

Fast-attack submarines are multi-mission platforms enabling five of the six Navy maritime strategy core capabilities - sea control, power projection, forward presence, maritime security, and deterrence. They are designed to excel in anti-submarine warfare, anti-ship warfare, strike warfare, special operations, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, irregular warfare and mine warfare. Fast-attack submarines project power ashore with special operations forces and Tomahawk cruise missiles in the prevention or preparation of regional crises.


USS San Juan (CL-54) - History

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Watch the video: CMC C L:54 P1